Flash Sale – 20% off select Family Tree Books

The following books are all on sale at 20% off, through July 5 or while supplies last.

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The Family Tree Polish, Czech And Slovak Genealogy Guide, How to Trace Your Family Tree in Eastern Europe; by Lisa A Alzo

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Trace Your German Roots Online, A Complete Guide to German Genealogy Websites; by James M Beidler

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Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com, How to Find Your Family History on the No. 1 Genealogy Website; by Nancy Hendrickson

FNW15-150p
The Family Tree Historical Maps Book, A State-by-State Atlas of US History, 1790-1900; by Allison Dolan

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The Family Tree Historical Maps Book – Europe, A Country-by-Country Atlas of European History, 1700s-1900s; by Allison Dolan

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How to Archive Family Photos, A Step-by-Step Guide to Organize and Share Your Photos Digitally; by Denise May Levenick

FNW18-150p
Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org, How to Find Your Family History on the Largest Free Genealogy Website; by Dana Mccullough

FNW4-150p
The Family Tree Problem Solver: Tried and True Tactics for Tracing Elusive Ancestors; by Marsha Hoffman Rising

FNW1-150p
The Genealogist’s U.S. History Pocket Reference: Quick Facts and Timelines of American History to Help Understand Your Ancestors; by Nancy Hendrickson

FNW11-150p
The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Germanic Ancestry in Europe; by James Beidler

FNW6-150p
Family Tree Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition; by Diane Haddad

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From the Family Kitchen, Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes; by Gena Philibert-Ortega

FNW07-150p
The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe; by Allison Dolan

The National Archives of Georgia Posts Historic Maps

Alerted by a ResearchBuzz posting about the country of Georgia having posted historic maps, I went looking to see what’s available.

Georgian-Maps-on-Flickr-350pw

First off – I recommend that anyone interested in Georgia should take a look at the National Archives of Georgia Flickr page. Wow! Lots of cool Georgian maps. Some have the place names translated, and many others are in Georgian.

The following announcement from Georgia’s National Agency of Public Registry was also posted. I found the http://www.reestri.gov.ge/ site difficult to navigate, even with the help of Chrome’s Georgian to English translation.

Agenda.ge,29 Oct 2015 – 15:24, Tbilisi,Georgia

Georgia’s National Agency of Public Registry has launched a project to digitalise and create an online archive of unique historical maps of Georgia that are accessible to citizens all over the country.

The Registry said more than 90 percent of the 1,550 topographic maps were already uploaded and available for public access at the site www.reestri.gov.ge.

The process had been difficult as some of the maps had been created in the second half of the 20th Century and had only been preserved as a single sample, the Agency added.

These maps, created over the period from 1953-1989, are of unique historical value and were subject of frequent requests by state offices and engineering organisations. The digital archive will ensure their preservation and enhance their accessibility,” National Agency of Public Registry chairman Papuna Ugrekhelidze said while announcing the project.

The maps – featuring scales of 1:2000 and 1:5000 – were collected from the cartographic archive of the Public Registry. The samples were scanned using high resolution digital processing and uploaded to the online catalogue, which included a search function.

The digitalised maps were expected to be useful for organisations and individuals in matters of administrative borders, defence, agriculture and infrastructure.

Georgia’s Public Registry was granted the cartographic office in 2010 after the unit was transferred from the Environment Protection and Natural Resources Ministry.

In recent years the Registry has carried out a number of cartographic projects and has produced digital maps for serving citizens and field specialists.

Bluesky Brings Old British Aerial Photos Online

The following press release is from directionsmagazine.com:

View the History of Britain from the Air as Bluesky Brings Old Aerial Photos Online
Thousands of aerial photographs of Britain, dating back more than seventy years, are now available online. Visitors to www.blueskymapshop.com can now search, view and download images from the Old Aerial Photos collection, which includes some of the earliest commercial aerial survey images, military photographs as well as many national archives. Offering a record of most major UK cities and towns, transport and utility infrastructure and commercial property developments, the images are an invaluable resource for anyone with a personal or professional interest in local studies, genealogy, boundary disputes, environmental land use research or town planning.

“Our Mapshop is already established as to the ‘go to’ place for modern aerial photography, with multiple dates of imagery available for the whole of England, Scotland and Wales,” says Rachel Tidmarsh, Managing Director of Bluesky. “The addition of the Old Aerial Photos archive was therefore the next step. Complementing the modern images, as well as the other map layers available, this archive is a really interesting and valuable resource for a range of applications.”

The Old Aerial Photos archive of historic aerial images includes around 100,000 individual images dating back to the 1960s. The newly available images include archives from some of the forerunners of today’s aerial photography industry as well as photographs from the UK military. Visitors to www.blueskymapshop.com can also access archive images from more familiar names such as Infoterra, GeoPerspectives and SCRAN (formerly BLOM).

Bluesky_Mapshop_OAP-300x213

The online archive can be searched using a postcode, street or city name, or Ordnance Survey grid reference. Once the Old Aerial Photos option has been selected the Bluesky Mapshop viewer window then displays small camera icons for each image available within the search area. Clicking on an icon displays a preview of the aerial image as well as information about the photograph including when it was taken.

By clicking through to the ‘Choose your product’ page, the visitor can get an overview of all products available within the search area before selecting the Old Aerial Photos option. Details of each image, including scale, date and price, are displayed and the visitor can choose different purchase options, such as Standard Scan or Archive Pack, accompanying Letter of Authenticity, Printed Version and Delivery Option.

Contacts: Bluesky, tel +44 (0)1530 518 518, www.blueskymapshop.com, www.bluesky-world.com

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Maps of the USA Showing Our Ancestry & Other Cool Stuff

Irish-Ancestry-Map-250pw

The following teaser is from a fascinating article by Ana Swanson, published June 19, 2015 in the online edition of the Washington Post.

The way that different races and ethnicities are spread around the U.S. says a lot about our history. Some groups ended up in a particular region of the U.S. through the invitation of friends and family; others relocated to a particular place because the timing of their migration coincided with the “opening up” or economic boom of a certain part of the U.S. Of course, other patterns stem from more tragic histories, including the concentration of Native Americans onto reservations and the imprint of slavery in the South.

Nathan Yau, a statistician who runs the blog Flowing Data, has made a series of gorgeous maps breaking down the population of America. The maps are part of his recent project to recreate the 1874 Statistical Atlas of the United States with the original design but 2013 data. Below are 15 of them that illustrate how the U.S. population got here. All of these categories are self-reported; the data is based on what Americans told Census workers about race, ethnicity and background.

Read the full article.

The Ethnic Mapping of America

I’ve posted blogs dealing with America’s ethnic map before. However, it’s worth doing again. The following excerpt is from an article in the April 18, 2014 edition of the online Washington Post:

Ethnic-America-Map-250pw

The history of European colonization of the Americas is still evident today in most of the United States. This very cool map shows which ancestries make up the largest population in each of the country’s 3,144 counties.

Some highlights to note: The Irish really do run Boston. People of Irish ancestry make up the largest contingent of counties in Massachusetts, and in parts of Rhode Island, southern New Hampshire and eastern New York. The only counties outside the Northeast where the Irish make up the biggest share of the population are in southern Oregon.

Read the full article by Reid Wilson.

Alsace-Lorraine: Atlantic Bridge to Germany

bk531Many years have passed since North America has seen any of its national boundaries change. Most of the World has proven less stable of recent decades. Even Europe has seen its share of change. World history is wroth with the ebb and flow of political and military boundaries. During the middle ages and on up to the First World War a modest portion of western-central Europe was a land of ever changing boundaries. In the heart of this area were the German people. At different times, different rulers and governments ruled the various lands, including areas of modern France, Austria, and more. As maps changed, so did the names of towns and parishes throughout the region. At one point a town may have a German name, and at another time a French name. Sorting out the names of places, as they would have appeared on records and documents at any particular time in history is difficult. Fortunately, researches have spent countless hours reviewing and documenting these variation.

Alsace-Larraine: Atlantic Bridge to Germany is the result of one such endeavor. In this book, the researcher will discover indexes and maps of place names in Alsace and Lorraine during the time of the German Empire (1871-1918). There are indexed alphabetically in both French and German. The book also includes a list of available records in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, as well as a short history and how to research the area.

Like a Disney cartoon, this book was out of print for nearly seven years. Fortunately, the author, Charles M. Hall, has granted rights to Origins. Origins has been pulled the book from the vaults, as it were, reprinted and re-released the book for 2012.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction and Explanation

Geography

Language

History

Immigration History

Emigration History

Military

Industry and Natural Resources

Transportation and Communication

Religion

Censorship

Personality of People

Family History Library

Church Records

Civil Registration

Census

Archives in France

Genealogical Societies in France

Resources for Alsace-Lorraine Research

Internet Websites

Bibliography

Word List (English, German, French)

Key to Map Terms

Government Districts

Cantons

Kreis Map and List

Key to Map Pages

Maps of Alsace-Lorraine

Placenames (alphabetized by German name)

Placenames (alphabetized by French name)

 

Alsace-Larraine: Atlantic Bridge to Germany is available from Family Roots Publishing

The New Google Maps is Out!

The following is from the Google Maps blog.

Google-Maps-logo-220pw

Over the coming weeks, the new Google Maps will make its way onto desktops around the world. Many of you have been previewing it since its debut last May, and thanks to your helpful feedback we’re ready to make the new Maps even more widely available.

It’s now even easier to plan your next trip, check live traffic conditions, discover what’s happening around town, and learn about a new area—with Pegman’s help if needed. Here’s a quick refresher on what to expect in the new Google Maps:

Make smarter decisions. Simply search for “coffee” in your neighborhood, and you’ll be able to see results and snippets right on the map. When you click on a cafe, the map will suggest related results that you may not have known about.

Read the full article.

An Atlas of German Migration and America

ce05Family Roots Publishing carries a great collections of Atlases. One particularly interesting series are those produced by Carrie Eldridge. These unique map books show the migration and population spread of early colonists and their descendant from the colonial days through the California Gold Rush years. Each focuses on trail groups and assoiciated settlements. In one particular book, Eldridge focuses on a specific group of colonist, the Germans. An Atlas of German Migration and America shows not only the settlement and expansion of Germans in America, but also illustrates the lands from which they came, along with a bit of the history behind their migration.

Like all of Eldridge’s atlases, this book offers pages at 11″ x 17″, a size which is easy to read. With two columns per text page, each the size of a standard page, this book is the equivalent to a book twice as thick. Mixed with the maps are brief histories. These evaluations examine German history and the reasons so many Germans emigrated from their homeland with information on migration routes and settlement in America. The author states:

“Following German settlers across America is not difficult, but in order to locate your particular ancestor, a researcher must identify the settlers, learn where they came from, when they immigrated, how they left their homeland and perhaps why they decided to leave. It may also be necessary to learn a fair amount of German history. All of these pieces of knowledge may eventually help located your ancestors.”

This book is meant to get the research process well under way. With brief, easy-to-understand histories and clear maps, the reader’s knowledge needed for successful research is quickly expanded.

Eldridge’s other maps reviewed on this website include:

 

Table of Contents

A. Introduction

B. The German Homeland in Europe

  1. Locating the German Nation
  2. History of the German Region
  3. European Battleground
  4. German Problems

C. German Origins and Destinations

  1. 4 Major Periods of German Migration
  2. American Colonial Period
  3. America of 1800
  4. Leaving German Europe

D. America – Land of Opportunity

  1. Nineteenth Century Migration
  2. Land for Sale – The Northwest Territory
  3. The Expanding American Frontier

E. Conclusion

Bibliography and Resources

 

Maps and Illustrations

Figure a – Modern Europe
Figure 1 – Physical Features of Europe
Figure 2 – Divisions of Germany 1871
Figure 3 – Germany of 1871 with Division of Modern Germany
Figure 4 – European Invasion
Figure 5 – The Reformation
Figure 6 – Extent of German States 1810-1815
Figure 7 – Europe during the Napoleonic Era
Figure 8 – Prussia’s Expansion 1648-1795
Figure 9 – Germany of 1871 with Division of Modern Germany #2
Figure 10 – Ethnic Makeup of Europe 1914
Figure 11 – Major Events in German History
Figure 12 – River Watersheds of Germany
Figure 13 – Major Ports of the German Migration Period
Figure 14 – Primary German Settlements
Figure 15 – Colonial America & Rhine River Valley
Figure 16 – Early German Settlements in Colonial America
Figure 17 – Colonial America Migration Routes
Figure 18 – 1795-1812 Routes to the West
Figure 19 – 1790-1812 Ohio Country
Figure 20 – Exit Ports of the Colonial Period
Figure 21 – Migration Inside Europe
Figure 22 – German Populations in America
Figure 23 – The Cotton Connection of the 1820s
Figure 24 – Bremen and the Tobacco Trade 1830s
Figure 25 – Transporting People – Hamburg’s Trade
Figure 26 – 1850 – Canals and Railroads of the Northwest
Figure 27 – Railroads 1870
Figure 28 – American Migration Routes and German Settlement

 

Order a copy of An Atlas of German Migration and America from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: CE05.

 

Don’t forget these great books on German migration and German’s in America:

Mapping Software For Genealogists

legweb12Web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars and among genealogists, Geoff Rasmussen is quite popular. Geoff is the host and regular presenter at Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Topics he has covered shows his wide and experienced knowledge base in genealogical research as well as Internet and digital tools valuable to genealogists.

Webinars are popular because a large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

Mapping Software for Genealogist is a webinar present by Geoff, covering some of the best software tools for mapping your ancestors. Rasmussen’s class was originally presented as a live webinar. The session runs for 1 hour.

Core topics covered in this webinar include the following:

  1. AniMap software (U.S. & Canada): learn how to find the correct county for the time period, and perform radius searches (list all cemeteries/churches within 10 miles of a place). For 30 years a researcher looked in the records of Woodstock, Windham County, Connecticut for their ancestor who was born there in 1720. AniMap easily shows that in 1720, Woodstock would have been in Suffolk County, Massachusetts. Now we know the correct location to find the records for that time period. Brick wall problem solved.
  2. Centennia software (Europe and Middle East): Have you ever wondered about the changing country borders in Europe? Have ancestors in Germany, Poland, or Prussia? Which is it? The Centennia Historical Atlas software shows the changing country borders from the 11th century to the present in Europe and the Middle East.
  3. Map My Family Tree software (entire world): plot your ancestors on a map of the world, track family migrations, plot to Google Earth, use the time scroll bar to dynamically select which time period you want displayed on your map and more.
  4. Legacy Family Tree’s mapping tools
  5. And other tips and tricks along the way

 

About the Author

Geoffrey D. Rasmussen is the father of four budding genealogists. He graduated with a degree in Genealogy and Family History from Brigham Young University and has served as director and vice-president of the Utah Genealogical Association. He is a dynamic genealogy speaker on all forms of genealogy technology, and as host of the Legacy Family Tree webinar series, has spoken virtually to nearly 100 different countries. He recently received the Distinguished Presenter Award at the prestigious RootsTech conference in Salt Lake City (2011). He has authored books, videos, articles, and websites, and develops the Legacy Family Tree software program. On a personal note, Geoff enjoys playing the piano, organ, cello and basketball. His favorite places are cemeteries, the ocean, and hanging out with other genealogists. He met and proposed to his wife in a Family History Center.

He is also the author of the popular Digital Imaging Essentials.

 

Get your own copy of Mapping Software for Genealogists from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $12.69. Enjoy the presentation again and again on your own computer.

Lands of the German Empire and Before

o-germanlands1Most countries, if not every country, in the world have experienced ebbs and flows in their political boundaries and territories. Some countries and fallen forever to be replaced by new ones. However, both as a people and a nations, few have probably seen as much change in the past 1200 years, as the German people have experienced in the area of modern day Germany. Over the centuries literally hundreds of small kingdoms and territories existed, swelling and falling through war and domination. Beginning as early as 843, larger territories were broken up into hundreds of small lands. The people of these various lands spoke a similar language and shared many of the same customs; yet, no leader could bring them under the control of a single king or government. The squabbling and constant border changes lasted until 1871, when the German Empire was established.

As genealogy is about people and places, when places change, you need a guide to provide direction. A very popular book on the subject of political boundary changes in Germany, and of immense use to the genealogist with German ancestry, is The Lands of the German Empire and Before. This book examines the history and maps of the ever changing lands which comprise, for the most part, today’s Germany. Author Wendy K. Uncapher has take the map of the German Empire and broken it down by individual states. She then examines each state in detail, providing maps and key historical facts for each. Uncapher also takes a detailed look at Prussia, dedicating a chapter to describing exactly what and where it was.. Chapter 3 of the books takes a quick look at the overall map of the German area through major historical periods, broken down as follows:

  • Holy Roman Empire
  • Confederation of the Rhine
  • German Confederation
  • North German Confederation
  • German Empire
  • Weimar Republic
  • Third Reich
  • Allied Occupation
  • Federal Republic of Germany and German Democratic Republic
  • Federal Republic of Germany

To genealogists researching their Germany heritage, especially prior to 1919, The Lands of the German Empire and Before is an indispensable tools for finding place names for cities and lands which have come and gone, or may exist today under a different name. With historic timelines, points of interest, and alternate names, this book is not lacking in interest or useful information.

Table of Contents

Preface

Turning Points for the German Empire

Chapter 1: States of the German Empire

Chapter 2: Prussia

Chapter 3: Eras of German Political History

Lands of the Holy Roman Empire

Rivers and Ports

Rulers of Major German States and Dynasty Families

Glossary

Internet Sources for Town Lists

Gazetteers

Bibliography

Index

Following is a List of Maps provided in the book (note: the individual states are grouped together as Kreise Maps covering pages 9–70):

  • Allied Occupation
  • Berg, Mark, Kleve, Julich
  • Bishopric and Archbishopric Territories
  • Black Forest
  • Confederation of the Rhine 1806–1814
  • Europe in 1871
  • Federal Republic of German Democratic Republic 1949–1990
  • Federal Republic of Germany (Deutschland) 1990–present
  • German Confederation 18115–1866
  • German Empire 1871–1918
  • Grand Duchy of Berg
  • Grand Duchy of Frankfurt
  • Grand Duchy of Warsaw 1807–1815
  • Grenzmark Posen-Westpreussen 1918–1938
  • Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation 800–1806
  • Kingdom of Westphalia
  • Kreise Maps (individual states)
  • Luxemburg
  • North German Confederation 1867–1870
  • Partitions of Poland 1772, 1793, 1795
  • Polish Corridor
  • Prussia, Growth of
  • Rivers and Ports
  • Saarland
  • Schaumburg
  • Stem Duchies 843
  • Sudentenland
  • Swedish Land in Germany
  • Teutonic Knight’s Land
  • Third Reich 1933–1945
  • Weimar Republic 1919–1933

 

Get a copy of The Lands of the German Empire and Before for your own or a society library; available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: 24.50.

American Indian Tribal Tract Reference Maps Now Available Online

Muckleshoot Reservation Map - 1 of 7
Many maps were created for the 2010 Census. One of these resources is the “Tribal Tract Reference Maps.”

The following is from the website:

These federal American Indian reservation-based maps show and label tribal census tracts and tribal block groups as delineated to support 2010 Census data dissemination. These maps also show the boundaries and names of American Indian reservations, off-reservation trust lands (ORTLs), Alaska Native areas, Hawaiian home lands, states, counties, county subdivisions, and places. Additionally, these maps display a base feature network including roads, railroads, and water bodies. These features are labeled as map scale permits. Each entity is covered by one or more parent map sheets at a single scale. An index map showing the sheet configuration is included for all entities requiring more than one parent map sheet. The map sheet size is 36 by 32 inches.

Using the maps online, you will want to blow them up to 150% or so. I found most that I had an interest in came onscreen as a PDF at 25%. Having lived in Western Washington for 40 years, I have an interest in the Puyallup and Muckleshoot Indian reservations. Each of these reservations has 7 pdf maps available.

Thanks to Accessible Archives for posting an item on Facebook about these maps.

The Making of Germany, Maps and History

o-germanlands1Few countries have as confusing a past as Germany. Over the centuries literally hundreds of small kingdoms and territories existed, swelling and falling through war and domination. Beginning as early as 843, larger territories were broken up into hundreds of small lands. The people of these various lands spoke a similar language and shared many of the same customs; yet, no leader could bring them under the control of a single king or government. The squabbling and constant border changes lasted until 1871, when the German Empire was established.

One very popular book on the subject, and just reprinted, is The Lands of the German Empire and Before. This book examines the history and maps of the ever changing lands which comprise, for the most part, today’s Germany. Author Wendy K. Uncapher has take the map of the German Empire and broken it down by individual states. She then examines each state in detail, providing maps and key historical facts for each. Uncapher also takes a detailed look at Prussia, describing exactly what and where it was in its own chapter. Chapter 3 of the books takes a quick look at the overall map of the German area through major historical periods, broken down as follows:

  • Holy Roman Empire
  • Confederation of the Rhine
  • German Confederation
  • North German Confederation
  • German Empire
  • Weimar Republic
  • Third Reich
  • Allied Occupation
  • Federal Republic of Germany and German Democratic Republic
  • Federal Republic of Germany

To genealogists researching their Germany heritage, especially prior to 1919, The Lands of the German Empire and Before is an indispensable tools for finding place names for cities and lands which have come and gone, or may exist today under a different name. With historic timelines, points of interest, and alternate names, this book is not lacking in interest or useful information. See all this book as to offer in the table of contents, listed below.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Turning Points for the German Empire

Chapter 1: States of the German Empire

Chapter 2: Prussia

Chapter 3: Eras of German Political History

Lands of the Holy Roman Empire

Rivers and Ports

Rulers of Major German States and Dynasty Families

Glossary

Internet Sources for Town Lists

Gazetteers

Bibliography

Index

Following is a List of Maps provided in the book (note: the individual states are grouped together as Kreise Maps covering pages 9–70):

  • Allied Occupation
  • Berg, Mark, Kleve, Julich
  • Bishopric and Archbishopric Territories
  • Black Forest
  • Confederation of the Rhine 1806–1814
  • Europe in 1871
  • Federal Republic of German Democratic Republic 1949–1990
  • Federal Republic of Germany (Deutschland) 1990–present
  • German Confederation 18115–1866
  • German Empire 1871–1918
  • Grand Duchy of Berg
  • Grand Duchy of Frankfurt
  • Grand Duchy of Warsaw 1807–1815
  • Grenzmark Posen-Westpreussen 1918–1938
  • Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation 800–1806
  • Kingdom of Westphalia
  • Kreise Maps (individual states)
  • Luxemburg
  • North German Confederation 1867–1870
  • Partitions of Poland 1772, 1793, 1795
  • Polish Corridor
  • Prussia, Growth of
  • Rivers and Ports
  • Saarland
  • Schaumburg
  • Stem Duchies 843
  • Sudentenland
  • Swedish Land in Germany
  • Teutonic Knight’s Land
  • Third Reich 1933–1945
  • Weimar Republic 1919–1933

 

Get a copy of The Lands of the German Empire and Before for your own or a society library; available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: 19.60.

German Maps & Facts For Genealogy

Just like the Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Prussia, Province of  Rhineland III and Kingdom of Bavaria, Palatinate (Pfalz) covered in the last newsline, German Maps & Facts For Genealogy is highly popular map book. Thus, the publisher had cause to reprint the book. Fresh, new copies are now available for those who still don’t have their own German Maps & Facts For Genealogy.

obk163German Maps & Facts For Genealogy is a book by by Wendy Uncapher & Linda Herrick. This book points out the uniqueness of Germany in over 100 maps including detailed historic maps of kingdoms, duchies, and principalities, to hand-rendered maps showing the religion of the states, location of major rivers, and what was included in Prussia. The German Settlement Growth map reaches as far back as 700 A.D. On the whole, the maps cover, in some detail, time from the 1600s through World War II, which effectively established Germany’s boundaries as they are still known today.

Mixed with the maps are basic fact relative to the map. For example, the state maps include facts like size, dominant religion, former names, principal crops, livestock, industry, rivers, and more.

The German people lived scattered in towns and communities all over central and eastern Europe for centuries. While most lived in or near modern Germany, German influence and power was wide spread. These maps help the reader better understand the territories and influence of the German people over the centuries in Europe

The following maps are included in this book:

  • German Settlement Growth – showing the evolution of German settlement from abt. 700 AD through the early 1800s
  • Germany 1892 (detailed map from the Chicago Chronicles Unrivaled Atlas of the World, Rand McNally & Company, Chicago 1901. The map includes an index to the major cities in 1901, as well as an index to the Kingdoms, Duchies, and Principalities – making the map extremely useful
  • Holy Roman Empire – 800-1806
  • Confederation of the Rhone 1806-1814
  • German Confederation 1815-1866
  • North German Confederation 1866-1870
  • German Empire (Deutsches Reich) 1871-1918
  • Weimar Republic 1918-1933
  • Third Reich 1833-1945
  • Allied Occupation 1945-1949
  • German Democratic Republic (East Germany) 1949-1990
  • Federal Republic of German (West Germany) 1949-1990
  • Federal Republic of Germany 1990-Present
  • Germany’s European Neighbors- Post WWII-1989
  • German Colonies – with explanation text and dates
  • German Emigration to the U.S.
  • Areas Affected by Wars – includes: Bohemian War 1618-20; Palatinate War 1621-23; Lower Saxon-Danish War 1625-29; Polish-Swedish War 1625-29; Swedish War 1630-34; Franco-Swedish War 1635-48; Treaty of Westphalia – 1648 Peace settlement for Thirty Years Was; Northern War 1655-60; Wars of Louis XIV 1667-97; Great Northern War 1700-21; War of Spanish Succession 1701-1714; Wars of Austrian Succession 1740-48; and the Seven Years’ War 1765-63 (The Third Silesian War). These are separate maps showing the regions affected by the war (as well as those unaffected)
  • German Migration 1940-1951
  • Historic Regions of the German Empire
  • German Dialects
  • German-Speaking Areas in Europe
  • German-Speaking Area in Russia
  • Religion – showing the regions where those of the Roman Catholic & Evangelical principally lived
  • Civil Registration – showing when Civil Registration started for the regions of Germany
  • Population Density about 1870
  • Forest & Mountains – showing the mountain ranges and forest for Germany
  • Elevation map for Germany
  • Major German Rivers
  • Industrial Products – showing major products of industry for Germany
  • Farm Products – showing major farm products for Germany
  • Farm Layout – map showing how farms were typically laid out around the villages in Germany – the example used is Maden, Hesse-Kassel
  • Railway Growth – 3 maps 1850, 1866 and 1880 with a chart of early important railway links
  • Ports and Shipping Routes – Trade Routes from Major Emigration Ports
  • Travel Distance – showing the German Empire and relative distances
  • Prussia – maps for: Brandenburg Land by 1640; by 1744; by 1793; 1806-1815; 1815-1865; 1866-1918
  • Maps of German States
    • Alsace-Lorraine
    • Baden
    • Bavaria
    • Brandenburg
    • Brunswick & Anhalt & Waldeck
    • East Prussia
    • Hanover
    • Hesse
    • Lippe & Schaumburg-Lippe
    • Mecklenburg
    • Oldenburg
    • Palatinate
    • Pomerania
    • Posen
    • Rhineland
    • Kingdom of Saxony
    • Province of Saxony
    • Schleswig-Holstein
    • Silesia
    • Thuringia
    • Westphalia
    • West Prussia
    • Wuerttemberg (Württemberg)
  • Relationship Map of Central Germany 1871 – showing how the German States lay out in relationship to each other
  • Detailed Map of Thuringia

Also found in this book are population charts; timelines showing why people left, where they left from, and where they were heading; migration figures; terms; lists of rivers, forests, and mountains. Following is a listing of some of the charts, text and timelines:

  • Events That Affected Migration
  • Most Common Reasons to Leave for all Time Periods
  • Annual Migration Statistics
  • German Emigration to the U.S.
  • Germanic Migration in Europe
  • German Migration 1940-1951
  • German Dialects
  • Religion – showing numbers of those of the Evangelical, Catholic, Jewish, Other, and non-Christian Religions in 1871 (by German State)
  • 1875 Male & Female Population for the German States
  • Population for German States in Selected Years
  • Population for the German States in 1855 & 1871
  • German Rivers by name of river and German state/states in which it flows
  • Major Ports Used by German Emigrants – with details and timeline
  • Place Names in Other Languages (German – English – French – Polish – Other)
  • Terms found in Records
  • Postal Codes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

 

Order German Maps & Facts For Genealogy from Family Roots Publishing;Price: $19.55.

Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920

The county has always been used as the basic Federal census unit. Genealogical research in the census, therefore, begins with identifying the correct county jurisdictions. Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 shows county outline maps across the United States at ten-year intervals. Effectively, a map of each state’s county lines at the time of each Federal census through 1920.

This work (one of the top-five best selling genealogy books) shows all U.S. county boundaries from 1790 to 1920. The books starts with an introduction to the Federal censuses, the records, and basic facts for each enumeration. Page xxvi provides a sample map, explanation, and legend as used on the nearly 400 maps in the book. Key elements include the following:

  • Each map shows modern counties and states with a white outline
  • Black outlines show the counties as they existed at the time of the relevant census
  • modern lines which match the old boundaries also appear in black (the black overlaying the while)
  • Defunct counties appear in the index in italics
  • Dashed lines indicate boundaries through water, uncertain boundaries, etc. (sometimes noted in the “notes” section on the page)

With each map there is data on boundary changes, notes about the census, and locality finding keys. There also are inset maps that clarify territorial lines, a state-by-state bibliography of sources, and an appendix outlining pitfalls in mapping county boundaries. Other details such as major Indian treaty lines are also covered.

The volume includes an index listing all present-day counties, plus nearly all defunct counties or counties later re-named. Maps in the book are shown in chronological order, alphabetically by state.

 

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction • Federal Censuses

  • History
  • Records
  • Completeness

Sample Map

U.S. Maps, 1790–1920

State Maps

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Loisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Appendix

  • Pitfalls in Mapping Boundaries

Bibliography

  • National Projects
  • General Sources
  • State Sources

County Index, by State

 

Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC5786; Price: $58.75.

Family Atlas

You can literally put your family history on the map using Family Atlas. Created by the folks at RootsMagic, Family Atlas is a fun way to graphically show your family’s history. By easily importing your genealogy from RootsMagic, Legacy, Family Tree Maker, or by GEDCOM file, you can create an interactive world map of your family history. This software package is a great add on to any genealogy database, allowing you to visually trace your family roots.

With Family Atlas you can pinpoint the location of important family events, trace your ancestor’s migration, publish your own customized maps and more. You can also add text, lines, photos, and more to your maps. You can automatically add markers based on your imported files or, you can place markers by hand without importing any data or to add to the data already added. Your imported data is automatically located against a database of 3.5 million location names included in the program.

The interactive map can be viewed as a globe or as a flat map. You can spin the globe and easily zoom in and out on any map. The more you zoom in the more details you see. Once you add any additional text, titles, or other customization, you can choose to print your map, save it as a .PDF file (Adobe Acrobat), or save as a number of standard image files. You can share your maps with family or even post them to a family website or include them in a family history book.

Using Family Atlas is about as easy as any program can be. Visually mapping your family’s history is entertaining but more importantly it is rewarding and educational. Seeing your families migrations, the proximity of relations and families that became joined by a marriage, the places family moved to and from for economic, religious, or other reasons all mapped out in front of you help the past become real. Maps add to the stories and history you already know.

Family Atlas is a great addition for any genealogist. You don’t have to have RootsMagic or any other genealogy database program to use this program. Having a family history program or having a GEDCOM file makes input easier and faster, but is not necessary.

If your are ready to map your family’s history, grab a copy of Family Atlas from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: RM06, Price: $29.35.