New Historic Records Databases at FamilySearch the Week of October 24, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:

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SALT LAKE CITY, UT — Free, searchable census records from Ghana, The Czech Republic, and New Jersey this week at FamilySearch.org. New historic records were also added from Sweden, Netherlands, Russia, and the United states, including almost 2 million indexed land allotment records for five Native American tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole) in Oklahoma.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Benin Civil Registration of Deaths 1891-2014 – 0 – 21,173 – New browsable image collection.

Czech Republic Censuses and Inhabitant Registers 1800-1990 – 0 – 1,646,966 – Added images to an existing collection

Ghana Census 1984 – 1,027,048 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Netherlands Noord-Holland Civil Registration 1811-1950 – 522,065 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Russia Lutheran Church Book Duplicates 1833-1885 – 78,912 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden Kopparberg Church Records 1604-1900; index 1628-1860 – 0 – 612 – Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Västernorrland Church Records 1501-1940; index 1650-1860 – 0 – 657 – Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Kalmar Church Records 1577-1907; index 1625-1860 – 0 – 838 – Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Halland Church Records 1615-1904; index 1615-1860 – 756,493 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Florida Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications 1885-1955 – 497 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Maine World War I Draft Registration Index 1917-1919 – 162,613 – 167,344 – New indexed records and images collection

Missouri Reports of Separation Notices 1941-1946 – 0 – 378,579 – Added images to an existing collection

New Jersey State Census 1865 – 212,731 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Oklahoma Applications for Allotment, Five Civilized Tribes 1899-1907 – 1,846,931 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

About FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

North Carolina Militia Records 1747 to 1893 Posted Online.

The following excerpt is from the State Archives of North Carolina Blog:

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The Troop Returns from the State Archives of North Carolina Military Collection are now available online via the North Carolina Digital Collections. This collection includes lists, returns, records of prisoners, and records of draftees, from 1747 to 1893. The majority of records are from the Revolutionary War North Carolina Continental Line

Read the full blog.

Thanks to Research-Buzz for the heads-up

Lost Roanoke Colony’s Ft. Raleigh? New Find on Roanoke Island Creates Stir

The following excerpt is from m.obsentinel.com

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Scott Dawson, a native of Hatteras Island and now a resident of Colington, has shared the location of a discovery he made on National Park Service property with that agency, which has now secured the area and posted surveillance to insure that intruders don’t disturb the site.

Doug Stover, park historian of the Park Service, said that park officials think that the site may be the remains of Fort Blanchard, a Civil War fort.

But if proven correct in his beliefs, Dawson will be the envy of many archaeologists who have spent their careers in the search of the long-lost Ft. Raleigh, Ralph Lane’s 1585 fort on Roanoke Island.

Read the full article.

To learn more about the Lost Colony of Roanoke check out this Wikipedia page.

FGS Announces $2 Million Dollar Mark Surpassed for Preserve the P​e​nsions Project

The following is from FGS:

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Significant Milestone Reached in Landmark Project Thanks to Donors

January 19, 2016 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announces the $2 million dollar mark has been surpassed in 2015 with the support of donors in the fundraising efforts to digitize the 7.2 million pension images for the 180,000 pensioners of the War of 1812 in the Preserve the Pensions project.

This is a landmark project. It marks the first time the genealogical community has come together to raise such a significant amount of money to preserve priceless documents. When completed, this project will save tax payers $3.45 million dollars. FGS’ previous successful efforts to index the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System with the help of volunteers produced a $6.3 million dollar tax savings. Hence, these two projects will result in nearly a $10 million dollar savings to tax payers.

“We are deeply appreciative of so many within the family history community who continue to support the Preserve the Pensions project,” says D. Joshua Taylor, FGS President. “This important milestone is the start of the ‘homestretch’ and is evidence of the passion and commitment amongst genealogists to preserve records for the future.”

For every dollar raised, .98 cents goes directly to digitizing the documents. There are no salaries paid for this project—the project costs are primarily to print materials to publicize the project. Additionally, in 2015 the project raised $208,401 in total cash donations. This amount, coupled with the generous match from Ancestry.com, doubled the funds raised to $416,802 bringing the total amount raised for the project thus far to $2,032,198!

With generous donations and continued help in sharing information about the project, significant progress can be made in 2016—possibly completing the fundraising for the project. The images for pensioners with surnames beginning with the letters “A” through “M” have already been posted on the Fold3 website and will remain free forever thanks to donors!

Furthermore, due to record preparation and image capture issues at the archives, there is a delay in the publication of images on the site. It is anticipated that these issues will be resolved quickly and that image publication will resume within the next 60-90 days. There is always a publication preparation delay between record capture and publishing the images online. In the meantime, because of the support of donors, great fundraising progress has been made to complete the project, and further donations can be made on the War of 1812 Preserve the Pensions website.

The Submarine H.L. Hunley is Revealed

Over the years I’ve blogged about the Hunley. Now the confederate submarine is again in the news. The following teaser is from an article posted September 17, 2015 at the FoxNews website.

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NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. – The hull of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship has been cleaned and revealed for the first time in 150 years.

After a year of painstaking work, scientists using small chisels and hand tools have removed encrusted sand, sediment and rust from the outside of the hand-cranked Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley.

Now, the outside appears much as it did when the Hunley and its eight-man crew rammed a spar with a powder charge into the USS Housatonic and sank the Union blockade ship off South Carolina in 1864.

Read the full article.

Divers Raise Wreckage of Confederate Warship CSS Georgia

The following headlines are from a fascinating AP article posted at dailymail.co.uk about the raising of the CSS Georgia.

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  • Divers raise wreckage of Confederate warship CSS Georgia in 5-ton chunks after vessel was sunk by its own crew 150 years ago
  • Navy divers began working in late June to recover cannons, unexploded shells and other artifacts
  • They finally started midweek on their last major task — retrieving an estimated 250,000 pounds of the Civil War ironclad’s armored siding
  • The CSS Georgia was scuttled by its own crew to prevent Gen. William T. Sherman from capturing the massive gunship

Read the article.

35,000 North Carolina Pension Confederate Applications 1901-1946 Going Online

The following excerpt is from an article by Wes Wolfe, posted July 25, 2015 at the Kinston.com website:

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A project between the State Archives of North Carolina and State Library of North Carolina seeks to digitize, place online and make searchable more than 35,000 North Carolina pension applications between 1901 and 1946.

According to Ashley Yandle, section head of the State Archives’ digital access branch, the last of the applications should be uploaded next week.

The State Archives explained the process in a post on its “History for All the People” blog when the project began in June 2014.

“For this project, the microfilm copies of the pension applications were scanned by staff in the Collections Management Branch,” according to the post. “There were approximately 80 reels of microfilm that became 80 digital folders with thousands of images in each one. We then exported the description from (Manuscript and Archives Reference System) and automated the creation of 35,000(-plus) digital folders, one for each application.
“The folder titles contain the record group and series indicator, the MARS ID number, and the name and county of the soldier. We are currently in the process of matching the digital images from the microfilm to the correct digital folders. Once we have the images placed into individual folders, we can then easily link the images to the description from MARS and upload it all to our Digital Collections.”

People can search and view the Confederate pension applications at digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/home/collections/1901-confederate-pension-applications.

Read the full article.

Grand Army of the Republic Death Records Books for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas & Nebraska – 15% Off

Dennis Northcott has published three volumes of GAR death records. FRPC has extended the 15% off sale thru Monday, August 3. See the details below.

The G.A.R. was organized in departments, most of which comprised one state. The departments published annual reports that were often titled Proceedings of the . . . Annual Encampment of the Department of . . ., Grand Army of the Republic. By the 1880s many of the department Proceedings began to include death rolls of the department’s members (or “comrades”) for the preceding year. These death rolls usually contain the comrade’s name, rank, company and regiment (or ship), date of death, and the name, number and location of the post to which he belonged.

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Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Illinois: Transcription of the Death Rolls, 1879-1947; by Dennis Northcott and Thomas Brooks

The G.A.R. was founded in Illinois in 1866 and became the largest association of Union Civil War veterans, its national membership peaking in 1890 at 409,489. As the veterans died, the membership inevitably declined. The national membership dropped to 213,901 in 1910 and 16,597 in 1930. The last surviving G.A.R. member died in 1956.

The first book in the series, titled Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Illinois: Transcription of the Death Rolls, 1879-1947, contains death records of more than 32,000 members of the Department of Illinois, who served in Civil War units from 36 states and territories.

Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Illinois: Transcription of the Death Rolls, 1879-1947; by Dennis Northcott and Thomas Brooks; 2003; ISBN 0-9728344-0-0; soft cover, 548 pages; Item #DN01.

Read a review of this book by clicking here: http://www.genealogyblog.com/?p=18956.

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Indiana Civil War Veterans: Transcription of the Death Rolls of the Department of Indiana, Grand Army of the Republic, 1882-1948; by Dennis Northcott

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The second book in the series, titled Indiana Civil War Veterans: Transcription of the Death Rolls of the Department of Indiana, Grand Army of the Republic, 1882-1948, contains death records of more than 22,000 G.A.R. members, who served in regiments from 31 states and territories.

Indiana Civil War Veterans: Transcription of the Death Rolls of the Department of Indiana, Grand Army of the Republic, 1882-1948; by Dennis Northcott; 2005; ISBN 0-9728344-1-9; soft cover; 416 pages; Item Number DN02.

Read a review of this book by clicking here: http://www.genealogyblog.com/?p=18865
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Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Departments of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948; by Dennis Northcott

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This third book in the series, titled Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Departments of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948, contains death records of more than 36,000 G.A.R. members, who served in regiments from 37 states and territories.

Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Departments of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948; by Dennis Northcott; 2007; ISBN-13: 978-0-9728344-2-1; ISBN-10: 0-9728344-2-7; soft cover; 658 pages; Item #DN03

Read a review of this book by clicking here: http://www.genealogyblog.com/?p=18839

Civil War Veteran’s Gravesite Emerges as the Monterey County Reservoir Dries Up

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The following teaser is from an article posted June 14, 2015 at the chicoer.com website.

Bradley [CA] Joseph Botts Jr. stepped out of his pickup truck into a scrubby, sunbaked field of salt grass and mustard weed and bent over a granite slab bearing a worn inscription: “Corp’l John McBride.”

The retired park ranger has known about the Civil War veteran’s gravesite for most of his life. But for much of the past half-century, McBride’s remains and the tiny ghost town where he met his fate lay at the bottom of a Monterey County reservoir, submerged due to a thirsty state’s need to corral every drop that flows through its parched ravines.

Read the full article.

FamilySearch Adds Over 2.3 Million Indexed Records & Images for the Czech Republic, Mexico, New Zealand, Ukraine, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 2.3 million indexed records and images for the Czech Republic, Mexico, New Zealand, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 771,097 images from the New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1843–1998 collection; 417,808 indexed records and 417,808 images from the US, BillionGraves Index collection; and 411,325 indexed records from the Mexico, San Luis Potosí, Civil Registration, 1859–2000 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799–1953 – 0 – 66,273 – Added images to an existing collection.

Mexico, Coahuila, Civil Registration, 1861–1998 – 24,898 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Mexico, San Luis Potosí, Civil Registration, 1859–2000 – 411,325 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1843–1998 – 0 – 771,097 – Added images to an existing collection.

Ukraine, Sumy Civil Registers, 1918–1922 – 0 – 34,691 – New browsable image collection.

US, BillionGraves Index – 417,808 – 417,808 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, Kentucky Confederate Pension Applications, 1912–1950 – 4,192 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Texas, World War I Records, 1917–1920 – 203,404 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States General Index to Pension Files, 1861–1934 – 4,292 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States, Register of Confederates and Civilians Who Died in the North, 1861–1865 – 25,511 – 679 – New indexed records and images collection.

Civil War 3 Book Bundle at 40% Savings & FREE Shipping!

Three Civil War books

It’s was exactly 150 years ago today that Lee surrendered at Appomattox, effectively ending the American Civil War. FRPC is celebrating by again offering a bundle of 3 Civil War best sellers, Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists; by William Dollarhide; Tracing Your Civil War Ancestors, by David A. Norris; and Life During the Civil War, by David A. Norris.

Regularly 52.85 plus $9.90 USA postage, these 3 books again bundled at 40% OFF! Only $31.71, plus FREE USA postage on all sales over $25. Sale ends at midnight EDT Monday, April 20, 2015.

Click here to purchase at 40% savings and no postage! Again – All purchases over $25 qualify for FREE postage through Thursday, April 20, 2015.

Following is a description of each of the 3 books.

Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists; by William Dollarhide; 2009; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp; Item # FR0113; Regular $32.95

Most genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. This new volume by William Dollarhide identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories are identified within this book:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories

The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

  • Online Resources
  • Libraries & Archives
  • ———–

    Tracing Your Civil War Ancestors, by David A. Norris; 2011; magazine-style, saddled stapled; 8.5×11; 85 pp; ISBN #: 9780978159276; Item #: MM004.

    This informative publication is the latest in Civil War research publications. It is authored by the same gentleman who wrote the popular Life During the Civil War.

    This book is also available in PDF format.

    The Research Resources You Need For Success!

    • Including:
      • Civil War Newspapers, what you need to know about this vital resource
      • Census Records, state censuses can be a treasure-trove of information!
      • Civilians in the War! How to find non-military relatives on the ‘Net
      • Veterans’ Organizations, a great post-war source of genealogical information
      • And much more!

    The following chapters are found in the booklet:

    • The first Steps to Finding a Civil War Ancestor – Some thoughts and tips on getting started in Civil War research.
    • Companies and Regiments: Civil War Army Units – Knowing how the armies were structured will help you understand records and references.
    • Non-Regimental and “Untypical” Soldiers – Some tips for finding soldier ancestors in unusual categories.
    • Emergency Troops, Militia and Home Guard – Records of temporary units might reveal a hard-to-find ancestor’s service.
    • Ensigns and Engineers: Ancestors in the Navies – Though tracking a relative in the navy can be challenging, there are many valuable resources available.
    • US Colored Troops and African-American Sailors – Here are some resources for African-Americans who served in the Civil War.
    • Southern Loyalists and “Galvanized Yankees” – Here are some resources to check for Southern ancestor’s who served with the Union.
    • To Helmira and Back: Prisoners of War – POW resources can fill in holes in your ancestor’s record, or reveal the fate of a missing ancestor.
    • Medical Records and Hospital Personnel – Records from Civil War hospitals contain a wealth of information on soldiers and staff.
    • Military Pay Resources – Civil War payroll records pay off again for genealogists.
    • The Civil War and the Census – Pre- and postwar censuses off important information on the lives and families of veterans.
    • The 1865 Parole Lists: To the Very End – These documents list the Confederate soldiers who endured to the end of the war.
    • Finding You Ancestors’ Flags – Regimental flags had important practical and symbolic purposes for Civil War Soldiers.
    • Buried in History: Civil War Cemeteries – Finding a soldier’s grave can seem impossible, but it doesn’t have to be a lost cause.
    • Civil War Pension Records and Wartime Relief – Pension records are a genealogical treasure trove for soldiers and their families.
    • Confederate State Pension Resources – A state-by-state guide to locating Confederate pension records.
    • Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Widows’ Resources – The records of these institutions may contain a wealth of detail that can’t be found elsewhere.
    • Civil War Veterans’ Groups – Records of veterans’ organizations might let you follow your ancestor into the 20th-century.
    • Wartime Civilian Records– Relatives who were not in the military may still have left a wealth of information about their lives.
    • Amnesty Papers and Southern Claims – Some potentially helpful sources for Southern relatives.
    • Spies, Smugglers and “Disloyal Citizens” – Records of civilian prisoners include ordinary citizens, political prisoners, and even politicians.
    • Finding Civil War Income Tax Records – You might find that your ancestors’ 1860s tax records are a source of family history.
    • A Gift From the Past: Civil War Newspapers – Here are some tips on finding your newsmaker ancestors.
    • A Picture in time: Civil War Era Photographs – You can find photos of people and places connected to your family, or even your ancestors.
    • Best of the Best: Classic Civil War Resources – These records contain the most essential information for Civil War Research.
    • National Archives Records – A soldier’s Compiled Military Service Record contains some of the most essential details of his service.
    • Finding Your Way Through the Civil War With Maps – Maps can help you follow your ancestor during the war or find a family farm near a battlefield.

    The booklet is heavily illustrated, highly informative, and a great value at only $9.95!

    ———–

    Life During the Civil War; by David A Norris ; 95 pp; Softcover; 2010; 8.5 x 11; ISBN: 978-0-9781592-5-2; Item #: MM001

    This book is also available in PDF eBook format .

    • Life in the Civil War Armies
    • Hospitals & Medicine
    • Letters Home
    • Music of the Civil War
    • Rations & Cooking
    • Civil War Humor
    • News from the Front
    • …And Much More!

    The publication starts right off with a 3-page dictionary of Civil War terminology. Did you know that hardtack crackers were often called worm castles? Further on, Norris points out that the hotel business boomed during the war years. My great-grandfather ran a hotel throughout the war, and did well. However, I’d never made the connection with the war effort before. The chapter on music I found especially interesting. Among other things, it’s noted that “Dixie” was written by Yankee abolitionist Daniel Decatur Emmett. The mail was a big deal to both the soldiers and their loved-ones at home. This was the case for both Northern and Southern families. However, keep in mind that when the Confederacy split from the Union, it had dramatic repercussions on the U.S. postal system. I found the entire booklet to be interesting – front to back.

    The following is from the table of contents.

    • Opening Notes – Notes From the Publisher, About the Author
    • From Abatis To Zouaves: A Civil War Dictionary – What were some of the popular sayings, slang, jargon and military terms in the 1860s?
    • Tale Of Two Capitals: Richmond And Washington – The war brought great changes to the lives of residents of Richmond and Washington
    • Home Away From Home: Hotels Of The Civil War – From four-star resorts to small town hostelries, hotel business boomed during the war
    • Soundtrack To A Conflict: Music Of The Civil War – Music, whether popular songs or military tunes, was as much a part of life then as it is now
    • Starvation Parties And Confederate Candles? – Southerners found unusual substitutes for scarce staples, like wheat, pins, shoe polish and coffee
    • Slumgullion, Salt Horse And Hell-Fired Stew! – What did soldiers, and their families at home, eat during the war years?
    • Relief From Reality: Civil War Humor – Popular humorists and jokes helped lighten hearts on both sides of the battle
    • Shinplasters And Greenbacks: Money During The Civil War – Banks, businesses, states, the Union and Confederacy all issued their own, incompatible, money
    • Zouaves: New York Firemen And Louisiana Tigers – Instead of the familiar blue and gray, some regiments donned bright colors and turbans
    • Man’s Best Friends: Pets In The Army – From the exotic to the common, animals were kept as companions and mascots
    • Johnnie Reb And Billy Yank: Life In The Armies – Fresh recruits and veterans of past conflicts faced new, and familiar, challenges in the Civil War
    • Fighting For Freedom: The US Colored Troops – African-American troops played a vital role in the Civil War
    • Sutler Shops: Convenience Stores For Soldiers – Where did soldiers get ink, ginger snaps or Valentine cards?
    • Life On Soap Suds Row: Army Laundresses – Laundry was a grueling, but essential, duty in army camps
    • Taking The Cars: Rail Travel During The Civil War – Though far from luxurious, or safe, trains became vital to the war effort and civilian life
    • What The Doctor Ordered: Hospitals And Medicine – Hospitals were understaffed, undersupplied and relied on dangerous cures and treatments
    • Common Civil War Medicines – Hospitals stocked standard treatments of the day, including mercury, opium and brandy
    • Fundraising Fairs: The US Sanitary Commission – Volunteer groups raised millions of dollars to improve military hospital and camp conditions
    • Picturing The Civil War: War Artists – Before modern photography and TV, how did people get a glimpse of the battles?
    • From The Frontlines To The HomeFront: Newspapers – Despite shortages of labor and ink, papers fed the public appetite for news and entertainment
    • Telegrams: At The Speed Of Lightning – The telegraph became an indispensible part of military and commercial communication during the war
    • Worth A Thousand Words: Photography In The Civil War – Despite technological limitations, photography boomed during the Civil War
    • “I Hain’t Got Any Stamps”: Confederate And Union Mail – Two postal systems kept soldiers and families in contact across shifting battlelines
    • The Civil War Navies: Cottonclads And Blockades – Whether they patrolled rivers or the South Pacific, a sailor’s life was far different than a soldier’s
    • The New Naval Warfare: Life On Ironclads – Heavily armored ironclads offered unique advantages, and dangers, to their crews
    • Missed It By That Much…! – From aseptic surgery to moon landings, the years after the Civil War were full of amazing changes

    Click here to purchase at 40% savings and Free USA postage on all purchases over $25 through April 20, 2015.

FamilySearch Adds Over 18.3 Million Indexed Records & Images for England, Italy, the UK, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 18.3 million indexed records and images for England, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 10,026,835 indexed records and 776,840 images from the England, Westminster Rate Books, 1634–1900 collection; 4,327,810 indexed records from the United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914–1920 collection; and 534,653 images from the Italy, Taranto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1926 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

England, Westminster Rate Books, 1634–1900 – 10,026,835 – 776,840 – New indexed records and images collection.

Italy, Taranto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1926 – 0 – 534,653 – New browsable image collection.

United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914–1920 – 4,327,810 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Kentucky Probate Records, 1727–1990 – 0 – 365,502 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925–1957 – 168,306 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Pennsylvania, Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records, 1866–1956 – 0 – 2,919 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837–1977 – 1,267,379 – 464,964 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, Texas, World War I Records, 1917–1920 – 0 – 400,918 – New browsable image collection.

Library of Congress Acquires Rare Civil War Stereographs

The following is from News from the Library of Congress:

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March 31, 2015: Selection of Images Now Online

The Library of Congress has acquired 540 rare and historic Civil War stereographs from the Robin G. Stanford Collection. The first 77 images are now online, including 12 stereographs of President Lincoln’s funeral procession through several cities and 65 images by Southern photographers showing South Carolina in 1860-61.

The images can be viewed in this gallery within the Library’s Prints and Photographs Online Catalog. More images will be added each month, until all are online.

The Library of Congress acquired the collection through a purchase/gift from Robin G. Stanford of Houston, Texas. During the past 40 years, Stanford has collected stereographs of both the Civil War and Texas. Through the assistance of the Center for Civil War Photography and retired Library of Congress curator Carol Johnson, the Library was allowed to select images that significantly improve its representation of the war and of life in mid-19th-century America. The center has also funded the digitizing of the first group of stereographs.

“I’m delighted that the Library of Congress has agreed to acquire my collection,” said Stanford. “I feel that the Library is the perfect home for the images, an ultra-safe and secure place where they will be fully accessible, not only now, but for future generations to come.”

Helena Zinkham, chief of the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress, said “Mrs. Stanford offered the Library an exceptional opportunity to fill key gaps in our holdings by making available selections from her unparalleled collection of American Civil War stereographs.”

The Library’s Prints and Photographs Division is a premiere research center for access to original Civil War pictures. But most of the documentary photographs were made by such master Northern photographers as Alexander Gardner and the Mathew Brady Studio.

“We have critical gaps in our Southern stereographs and in images by local photographers in both North and South. The Stanford Collection can provide scenes with slaves in 1860 South Carolina, views in Louisiana and Texas, rare coverage of naval and land battles, small Pennsylvania battlefront towns and much more,” said Zinkham. “The Library has long sought to expand its coverage of the war. At the start of the Civil War 150th anniversary years, the Liljenquist Collection brought remarkable portraiture of enlisted men, both Confederate and Union. As the anniversary years conclude, the Stanford Collection adds rare views of the South made by the people who lived there. Together, these collections can fuel new research for years to come.”

The 77 images now online include 12 from Lincoln’s funeral procession through cities, including Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Springfield, Illinois. The images show the president’s casket in elaborate open-air hearses that passed through the main streets of the cities; buildings draped in mourning bunting; and crowds lined up to see the procession.

The other 65 images are stereograph photos taken by James M. Osborn and Frederick E. Durbec, who operated a photography business, “Osborn & Durbec’s Southern Stereoscopic & Photographic Depot” on King Street in Charleston, South Carolina, from about 1859 to1863. The stereo photos show scenes from South Carolina in 1860-61, including slaves living and working at Rockville Plantation; Fort Sumter after bombardment; Fort Moultrie; and the Charleston Battery.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division holds more than 15 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day. International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history. For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 158 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats. The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.

Documentary of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg Proposed

1st-Minnesota-Volunteer-Regiment-200pw

The 1st Minnesota Volunteer Regiment was in the Battle of Gettysburg, with over 200 soldiers killed or wounded (82% casualties). According to an AP article posted at the Lacrossetribune.com website, the soldiers bought time for Union troops, who eventually won the fight. Now film makers, with Bills Semans as the director, are looking for some $750,000 in Minnesota state funds to help produce a documentary. The group has raised over $100,000 for story research and development, but much more is needed.

Read more about the proposed film at the Lacrossetribune.com website.