The List of Church of Ireland Parish Registers – Relaunched & Available Online as a Color-Coded PDF

The following excerpt is from the ireland.anglican.org website:

List-of-Irish-Parish-Registers_350pw

The List of Church of Ireland Parish Registers has again been extensively revised and updated, and in a collaborative project between the RCB Library and the Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS), it now includes live links to parish register sources – copies, transcripts and indexes – available online.

The IGRS was founded in 1936 as a direct response to the destruction of the Public Record Office of Ireland (PROI) in June 1922 during the civil war. It was the world’s first society dedicated to the study of Irish genealogy. 2016 marks its 80th anniversary and this collaborative project is one of the ways the Society is celebrating its important milestone.

The re–launched List represents months of painstaking volunteer work by IGRS Fellow Claire Santry and should significantly assist researchers by providing them with a search tool that links easily to online information.

Go to the website and read the full article.

Vice-Presidential Nominee Tim Kaine – the Genealogist

The following excerpt is from an interesting article posted to the July 23, 2016 edition of IrishCentral.com:

Tim Kaine with wife Anne Holton
Tim Kaine with wife Anne Holton

…Kaine certainly feels Ireland in his heart. During his acceptance speech for The American Ireland Fund Leadership Award, he talked about his family’s 2006 trip to Ireland, where they found the ruins of his great-grandfather’s cottage in Killashee Parish, in Longford…

He visited Ireland during his first year as governor of Virginia, with his wife Anne and three children. They visited the ruins of the home of his great-grandfather, PJ Farrell who later emigrated to Kansas, where he became a successful farmer.

Kaine told the dinner about how his children were unhappy with leaving “cool” Dublin to search for his family roots in County Longford.

“As we drove to Longford, which isn’t exactly the tourist zone, they continued to complain,” he said.

He also has Kilkenny root, which makes him the exception, as most Irish roots go back to the traditional Irish western seaboard counties like Mayo, Galway, and Kerry.

Read the full article.

The National Library of Ireland is Archiving the Irish Internet

The-National-Library-of-Ireland-Reading-Room_250pw

Fascinating… I had not spent much time thinking about the archiving of all these internet postings we do. The following excerpt is from a good article posted July 22, 2016 at The Irish Times.

With about 10 million objects from nearly 1,000 years of Irish history, archiving the internet isn’t the first thing that jumps to mind about the National Library of Ireland.

Nestled in the centre of Kildare Street since 1890, the Library’s treasured materials constitute the most comprehensive collection of Irish documentary material on the planet. But what of its future? If, say, our distant descendants wanted to research what life was like for us all way back in 2016 – say February’s general election, or even last year’s Marriage Equality referendum, with all their social media feeds in-tow – internet archives will likely be their default option.

“How we are collecting in the National Library is obviously changing, but it’s the same principles,” says Maria Ryan, a web archivist in the Digital Collections Department. “What newspapers were 20 years ago, websites are now. So we’ve recognised that need to collect and preserve that information for the people of Ireland, but in an ever-evolving form.”

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

County Guides to Irish Research – 20-50% Off – Now Through Saint Patrick’s Day or While Supplies Last

Ireland-from-Space-200pw

Family Roots Publishing is offering a number of guides to Irish research at 20 to 50% Off – Now through Thursday, March 17, 2016, or while current supplies last. These excellent guidebooks are imported directly from Flyleaf press in Ireland. Over 34.5 million Americans claim ancestry originating in Ireland. Many of these folks are searching for their Irish roots. Click on the links to purchase these titles at sale prices.

In-Print Guides to Irish Research – by County:

10 Million New Irish Catholic Parish Registers With FREE Access Through March 7, 2016!

FREE-Irish-Records-March-1-7-2016-570pw

The following was received from FindMyPast:

We’re excited to reveal the launch of 10 million new Irish Catholic Parish Registers on Findmypast today. Covering the majority of Ireland, this incredible record set includes 40 million names, 3,500 registers and over 1,000 parishes. To celebrate, we’re making all 110 million Irish records free for everyone until 7th March. Click on the links or on the illustration to search.

National Archives of Ireland to Get an Upgrade

The following teaser was posted January 20, 2015 at independent.ie:

Heather Humphreys looking at documents in the National Archives, Bishop Street, Dublin 8. Photo: Douglas O'Connor.
Heather Humphreys looking at documents in the National Archives, Bishop Street, Dublin 8. Photo: Douglas O’Connor.

Some four million State files are set to have a new home as part of a new €8m redevelopment of the National Archives of Ireland.

The design and construction phase at the archives’ Dublin headquarters in Bishop Street will begin later this year, and will see an estimated 100 million pages stored in more suitable conditions.

It is also hoped the investment will allow for sufficient storage to accommodate a change to a 20-year rule for the release of State papers.

Launching the plans, Arts Minister Heather Humphreys said the expansion would transform the building into a “state-of-the-art” facility.

Read the full article.

Patricia Moorhead Appointed Emeritus Member of AGI

The following is from AGI:

Patricia Moorhead (right) with AGI colleagues Michael Walsh and Máire Mac Conghail (AGI President).
Patricia Moorhead (right) with AGI colleagues Michael Walsh and Máire Mac Conghail (AGI President).

Accredited Genealogists Ireland (AGI) is pleased to announce that its very first Emeritus Member is Patricia Moorhead. She is a popular figure in Irish genealogy, known particularly for her witty and entertaining talks. Pat, as she is familiarly known to her friends, has been involved in family history research for over two decades. She was passed by the APGI (now AGI) assessors in 1999 and retained membership until a year ago, when she chose to retire.

At AGI’s Annual General Meeting in December 2015 a constitutional amendment was passed, allowing the Council to confer emeritus status on members or associate members who have retired. The status is not automatic on retirement. It recognised a long and valued association with AGI. Immediately after the AGM, a Council meeting was held at which Patricia Moorhead was named as the first person to receive Emeritus Membership. The decision was announced later that day at the annual lunch.

Back in the 1990s Mrs. Moorhead completed the diploma in Local History at NUI Maynooth and the Certificate in Genealogy at UCD, under the instruction of Sean Murphy. She took an active role in the Irish Genealogical Congress from 1994 and joined the committee of the Irish Family History Society in 1995. As well as having a career as a professional genealogist, Pat devoted much time to researching a relative who was awarded the Victoria Cross. Many of her projects led to fascinating and extraordinary coincidences, and to lectures that captivated and entertained her listeners. Though retired, she intends to keep up contact with her colleagues by attending AGI events.

About Accredited Genealogists Ireland:
AGI – Accredited Genealogists Ireland (formerly the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland) was founded in Belfast in 1986. It acts as a regulating body to maintain high standards amongst its members and to protect the interests of clients. Membership is open to professional genealogists throughout the island of Ireland. Admission to membership is on the recommendation of an independent Board of Assessors.

NEW – Tracing Your Donegal Ancestors, 3rd Edition – On Sale for 15% off Thru Sept. 1

Donegal-3rd-Edit-cover-300pw

Flyleaf Press has a new 3rd edition of Tracing your Donegal Ancestors, written by Godfrey F. Duffy & Helen Meehan. FRPC just got in a stock from Dublin, Ireland. We’re making them available for 15% off thru Sept 1, 2015. Click on the illustration or the links to order.

In comparison with most other Irish counties, Donegal has fewer records of value to family historians. This makes it important to use the existing records to their best advantage. Donegal families are a mixture of native Gaelic families, and of Scots-Irish families who came to Donegal from the 17th century onward.

Common names in the county include O’Neill, O’Donnell, Bonner, Barr, Bradley, Duffy, Friel, Gormley, O’Kane, Gallagher, Harkin, McBride, McCafferty, McDaid, Patton, Morrissey, Ward and Sweeney.

County Donegal is one of the counties which experienced a high level of emigration to North America and elsewhere. This book sets out the records available for Donegal, where they can be accessed, and how they can be used to best effect in tracing Donegal families.

Reviews
” ..a valuable addition to Flyleaf’s excellent series of Irish county guides. It achieves its task…though a combination of lucid exposition and examples from the relevant sources. The most impressive facet of the book is its comprehensive coverage… With its superb bibliography and logical layout this represents excellent value for money and is a must for anyone with Donegal ancestors” – Who do you Think you are Magazine

” The publication is one of a kind and does all the correct things required of such a book, directions to availability of vital data, examples of such data and all other relevant information which will steer the beginner and the more experienced researcher when searching for Donegal ancestors. ” – Irish Family History Society

” The authors are natives of the county and experienced genealogists who guide the reader through the various sources of information…(and)… explain in a straightforward way how to go about investigating your Donegal Ancestry. Anyone starting out for the first time will find this an invaluable resource ” – Books Ireland

” This new and greatly expanded edition sets out the range of Donegal genealogical sources available to the family history researcher, devoting a chapter to each source type explaining what information each contains, and where each record can be accessed.” – Irish World (UK)

” The most impressive facet of the book is its comprehensive coverage… With its superb bibliography and logical layout this represents excellent value for money and is a must for anyone with Donegal ancestors.” – Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine January 2009

” This new and greatly expanded edition sets out the range of Donegal genealogical sources available to the family history researcher, devoting a chapter to each source type explaining what information each contains, and where each record can be accessed.” – Irish World (UK)

Tracing your Donegal Ancestors, 3rd Edition; by Godfrey F. Duffy & Helen Meehan; 161 pp; Paperback; 5.75×9; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781907990229; Illustrated; Item # FLP003.

Click on the link to order your copy. On sale for 15% off through September 1, 2015

NEW – Finding Your Ancestors in Kerry [Ireland] – 15% off through Sept 1

Kerry-Ancestors-cover-300pw

Flyleaf Press in Dublin has just released a new Irish research guide. It’s titled “Finding your Ancestors in Kerry;” and is written by Kay Moloney Caball. As with all the books in the “Finding Your Ancestors” series, the volume details research in the county.

The book describes all the various sources of information which are available for doing research, where each of these can be accessed and how to best use them in your search for your ancestors. The people of Kerry have a rich history. Although very predominantly Gaelic, their origins include Normans, English, Danish Vikings, French Huguenots and German Palatines. All of these have contributed to the character of twentieth century Kerry.

Common names in the county include O’Sullivan, O’Shea, Sheehan, O’Dohoghue, O’Driscoll, Falvey, O’Connor, Moriarty, McCarthy, Kelleher, O’Connell, O’Mahoney, Fitzgerald, Cantillon, Stack, Hussey, Clifford and Fitzmaurice.

Finding your Ancestors in Kerry; by Kay Moloney Caball; 160 pp; Paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781907990083; illustrated (b/w); Item # FLP022.

Click on the link to order at 15% off through September 1.

Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors, 2nd Edition – On Sale for 15% off thru Sept. 1

Mayo-2nd-Edition-cover-300pw

Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors has been out of stock in the FRPC warehouse for some time. We just got a new stock in and FRPC is making it available for 15% off through Sept. 1, 2015.

The entire Irish county research series of “Tracing Your Ancestors” and “Finding Your Ancestors” was created to help researchers both at home [Ireland] and abroad trace their family tree on a county by county basis. Essentially, each book in the series provides a listing of record and document resources within the given county. Each county has its own rich history, with a variety of key settlers, like the Normans, the Vikings, and other groups establishing the first communities and towns. With so many Irish descendents living outside the country, having a county by county resource could prove the very thing needed for finding one’s family in Ireland.

Mayo county sits on the northwest coast and is the second largest county in Ireland. The entire county’s population is around 124,000, down over 215,000 since 1841. Its heritage is a mixture of native Gaelic, Norman, and immigrant Gaelic from Northern Ireland; plus, the normal mixture, if in small numbers, of other ethnic groups from other places.

According to the author, “Mayo, like many other western Irish counties does not have a rich store of records. Therefore it is important that the full range of sources available are used effectively. These sources vary widely in their genealogical content…” This book lists available records of genealogical interest, with details about each source, their location, and reference.

Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Chapter 1. Introduction

Chapter 2. How to Use This Book

Chapter 3. Administrative Divisions

Chapter 4. Civil Registration

Chapter 5. Census and Census Substitutes

Chapter 6. Church Records

Chapter 7. Wills, Administration and Marriage Licenses

Chapter 8. Land Records

Chapter 9. Commercial and Social Directions

Chapter 10. Newspapers

Chapter 11. Gravestone Inscriptions

Chapter 12. Surnames, Family Names and Histories

Chapter 13. Mayo in 1789

Chapter 14. Further Reading

Chapter 15. Library, Archives and Society Addresses

Index

 
Order Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: FLP017; Sale Price: $16.96 – Reg. $18.95.

New FamilySearch Collections Posted the Week of July 13, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Family historians hungry for historic Irish records will enjoy FamilySearch’s new collection, Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912. These indexed court documents bring 22 million records to your fingertips. These records were originally filmed at the National Archives of Ireland and the index was created by findmypast.com. See the table below for additions to over 60 historical record collections, including 46 million US obituaries. Click on the collection’s link to start your discovery.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Australia New South Wales Census (fragment) 1891 – 0 – 21,315 – Added images to an existing collection
Belgium Antwerp Civil Registration 1588-1910 – 0 – 1,670 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 0 – 164,642 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 1,642,660 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863 – 970 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Saxony Dresden Citizens’ Documents and Business Licenses 1820- 1962 – 0 – 855,956 – Added images to an existing collection
India Bihar Koilukh Pandit Kirtinand Jha Maithil Brahmin Genealogical Records 1750-1990 – 0 – 175,363 – Added images to an existing collection
India Hindu Pilgrimage Records 1194-2015 – 2,782,487 – 2,843,557 – New indexed records and images collection
Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 – 21,833,839 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 0 – 318 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Cremona Civil Registration (State Archive) 1744-1942 – 0 – 1,325,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 0 – 393,814 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943 – 0 – 111,837 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Pesaro Civil Registration (State Archive) 1808-1813 1861- 1865 – 0 – 75,456 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Urbino Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1942 – 0 – 709,381 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Ragusa Civil Registration (State Archive) 1900-1940 – 0 – 111,281 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Toscana Civil Registration (State Archive) 1804-1874 – 0 – 80,833 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Baja California and Baja California Sur Catholic Church Records 1750-1984 – 0 – 363 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Chihuahua Catholic Church Records 1632-1958 – 0 – 195 – New browsable-image collection.
Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984 – 0 – 1,077 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Hidalgo Catholic Church Records 1546-1971 – 0 – 574 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Michoacán Catholic Church Records 1555-1996 – 0 – 2,758 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Tamaulipas Catholic Church Records 1703-1964 – 0 – 1,294 – Added images to an existing collection
Peru Callao Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 42,583 – Added images to an existing collection
Perú Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 111,769 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Negros Occidental Roman Catholic Diocese of Bacolod Parish Registers 1755-1976 – 0 – 95,820 – New browsable-image collection.
Spain Province of Valencia Miscellaneous Records 1251-1950 – 0 – 850,597 – Added images to an existing collection
Sweden Halland Church Records 1615-1904; index 1615-1860 – 0 – 972 – Added images to an existing collection

Canada: Newfoundland Vital Records 1840-1949 – 347,134 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Births 1864-1877 – 0 – 6,103 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Deaths 1864-1877 – 0 – 20,661 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Marriages 1864-1918 – 0 – 15,831 – Added images to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index – 1,513,553 – 1,513,553 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

United States Records

United States Census 1790 – 1,606 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Census 1800 – 20 – 18,454 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Hospital and Medical Records 1865-1872 – 4,641 – 44,734 – New Indexed records and images collection
United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 – 46,769,836 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Index to Service Records War with Spain 1898 – 123,334 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California Death Index 1905-1939 – 2,086,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Delaware Vital Records 1680-1971 – 624,395 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Marriages 1811-1950 – 83,822 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 504,033 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1915 – 0 – 9,802 – Added images to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1925 – 5,573,816 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky Vital Record Indexes 1911-1999 – 9,865,944 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Louisiana First Registration Draft Cards compiled 1940-1945 – 39,967 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Boston Passenger Lists Index 1899-1940 – 1,577,127 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1627-2001 – 0 – 182 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Births 1867-1902 – 0 – 1,428 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries 1820-2006 – 1,389,458 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Probate Records 1735-1970 – 0 – 1,952 – Added images to an existing collection
South Dakota School Records 1879-1970 – 2,807,212 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1950 – 3,024,053 – 1,831,660 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database 1847-1868 – 58,333 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Utah Uintah County Discharge Records 1893-2009 – 0 – 2,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Land and Property Records 1888-2004 – 0 – 195,963 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Marriage Records 1888-2015 – 0 – 8,687 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Naturalization and Citizenship Records 1888-1929 – 0 – 409 – New browsable-image collection.
Vermont St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings 1895-1924 – 6,696,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Vermont Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1732-2005 – 0 – 458,533 – Added images to an existing collection

Help Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

644,000 New Records & Newspaper Articles At FindMyPast

The following is from the June 26, 2015 FindMyPast Friday Announcement at FindMyPast:

Find-My-Past-logo-2015-239pw

Australia Convict ships 1786-1849

Containing over 188,000 records, Australia Convict ships 1786-1849 date back the ships of First Fleet and include the details of some of the earliest convict settlers in New South Wales. These records are made up of five separate sets of musters and indents held by the the State Records Authority of New South Wales. They do not cover every convict who arrived in Australia on those early ships as many have been lost or scattered to other places. Indents records were used in the early settlements to keep track of the convict population while musters lists of who was on board a ship were taken at the port of embarkation.

Each record contains a transcript and a black and white image of original documents. Indents can include a variety of information about individual convicts such as their native place, details of their offence and sentence, a physical description and details of their family members. Musters usually only give a name, date and place of trial and sentence. Musters were also taken after disembarkation.

Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867

Containing almost 27,000 records, the Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867 list the details of convicts who built new lives in New South Wales. The records list the details of pardons by the Governor and date back to the earliest days of the colony. Pardons were generally handed out to convicts serving life sentences but in the earliest years of the colony the Governor had the power to grant both free and conditional pardons as rewards for good behavior, for special skills or for carrying out special duties or tasks. Conditional pardons meant that a convict was free as long as they stayed within the colony, known as “Government limits”. Most convicts received a conditional pardon. Absolute pardons meant that a convict’s sentence was completely remitted. They were free with no conditions and could move beyond the limits of the colony or even return to Britain.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of original documents. As well as listing the names of pardoned convicts, the records also include the name of the ship they arrived on, the term of the sentence they served , any additional notes, and details of their release.

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851 contains over 26,000 records. Convicts in Australian penal colonies were actually encouraged to marry as Governors believed that marriage and family life were good for both the morality and stability. Convicts who did marry could apply for tickets of leave or pardons as well as assistance in establishing a household. In the early years of the colonies, many convicts married even if they had wives or husbands back home. The Governor had to give permission before any marriage could take place and copies of the banns would be sent by the local clergy to the Colonial Secretary.

Each record contains a transcript as well as an image of the original document. The registers list the convict’s name, the name of their spouse, their profession and the length of their sentence as well as the sip they arrived on and when they were given their freedom. Some approved marriages did not go ahead so you might find more than one successful application for your ancestor.

Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1960

Over 7,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1948. The new additions are taken from the Central Register of Female Prisoners, held by the Public Record Office Victoria. The register kept a record of prisoners that passed through Pentridge prison in Coburg, Victoria. Pentridge was built in 1850 and was the central prison in the Melbourne region from about 1860. Each record includes a transcripts and scanned image of the original registers and many include mug shot photographs of individual’s prisoners.

They list fascinating details about not only the prisoners’ offences, sentences and incarceration, but also biographical information such as their name, date of birth, country of origin and occupation. Remarks on the register may also include the name of the ship on which the prisoner arrived if they were not born in Australia.

Sligo Workhouse Admission and Discharge Registers 1848-1859

Containing of over 9,000 records, the Sligo workhouse registers 1848-1859 consist of handwritten registers taken by the Sligo Union workhouse, one of three workhouses in the County Sligo. Levels of poverty in Ireland were far higher than in England and the workhouse was often an inescapable part of life that would have touched many, if not most Irish families. They were designed for the most destitute of the poor who could not support themselves. Conditions were harsh and inhuman. Inmates were stripped of their dignity, they were no longer a person but instead a pauper inmate.

The records pre-date civil registration and will be valuable resource to those with Sligo ancestors given the lack of 19th century census material available in Ireland. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document. The registers list the names of new arrivals and details including their age, occupation, religion, any illnesses or infirmities, family members, local parish, their condition on arrival (usually describing clothes or cleanliness) and when they were discharged or died.

Clare Poor Law Unions Board Of Guardians Minute Books

Containing over 63,000 records, the Clare Board of Guardian Books were taken from the Kilrush and Ennistymon unions, two of eight poor law unions located in County Clare. The minute books recorded weekly reports on the number of inmates, new arrivals, births, deaths and discharges. They also recorded expenditures including food supplies and salaries as well as the number of inmates receiving medical treatments.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of the original handwritten minutes. The amount of information contained in the image can be considerable. The minute books recorded what was said at each meeting of the Board of Guardians, including correspondence and contracts but also individual cases that came before the Board. These include the day-to-day running of the workhouses, disciplinary matters concerning both staff and inmates, individual case histories, foundling children’s fostering and upkeep and the hiring of foster mothers and wet nurses.

Irish newspaper update

Over 308,000 new articles have been added to our collection of historic Irish Newspapers. Substantial additions have been made to Saunder’s News-Letter, a title that dates all the way back to 18th century Ireland and now contains nearly 950,000 fully searchable articles.

The entire collection now covers over 175 years of Irish history (1748-1924) and contains over 9.1 million articles from 72 national, local and regional titles from every province and major city in Ireland.

North West Kent Baptisms

Nearly 2,000 new records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish baptisms. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the parish of Southfleet.

Each baptism includes a transcript of the original parish record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the child’s name, date of birth, date of baptism, place of baptism, mother’s name, father’s name, father’s occupation, residence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Marriages

Over 500 records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish marriages. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Southfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original marriage record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most transcripts will include the couple’s names, date of marriage, place of marriage, marital status, whether they were married by banns or licence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Burials

Over 1,500 burial records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish records. These new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Sothfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original burial record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the deceased’s name, burial date, place of burial, residence, age at death, description and any additional notes.

Prisoners of War 1715-1945

Over 71,000 fascinating Prisoner of War records containing the details of American soldiers captured during the War of 1812 have just been released in partnership with the National Archives. The new records form the second phase of the wider Prisoners of War 1715-1945 collection, the first phase of which was launched in April with the release of over 43,000 World War 1 records. The records are taken from British Foreign Office, Colonial Office, Admiralty and Air Force papers held by the National Archives.

The latest additions record the details of Danish, French, Prussian and American prisoners captured by British Forces during the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. They reveal when and where they were captured, where they were held and many include full physical descriptions such as hair, colour eye colour, build, complexion and any distinguishable marks. Records were also kept of their provisions and the supplies they received for example blankets, clothing, beds, etc. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original handwritten document. The amount of information in each record can vary depending on the type of document and the amount of detail recorded at the time of the event.

British Newspapers

Over 2.8 million new searchable articles have been added to our collection of historic British Newspapers. The latest additions include 3 brand new titles, the Cornish Times, Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, Tadcaster Post, and the General Advertiser for Grimstone, as well as substantial updates to 37 existing titles.

The total collection now stands at over 124 million articles and 341 unique titles, covering 245 years of British history (1710-1955).

Irish Catholic Parish Registers to Go Online July 8, 2015.

Irish-Parish-Registers-250pw

The following excerpt is from an article posted April 29, 2015 at silconrepulbic.com

The entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms held by the National Library of Ireland – 400,000 films amounting to the most important source of Irish family history – is to be made available online this July.

The National Library of Ireland (NLI) has been working to digitise the microfilms for more than three years under its most ambitious digitisation programme to date.

Announced in December, the archive of parish register microfilms will go live on 8 July.

The parish register records are considered the single most important source of information on Irish family history prior to the 1901 Census. Dating from the 1740s to the 1880s, they cover 1,091 parishes throughout the island of Ireland, and consist primarily of baptismal and marriage records.

Read the full article.

Fr. Francis A. Gleeson WWI Diaries, Brigade Rolls & Correspondence Digitized & Posted Online

Father-Francis-Gleeson-145pw

The Fr. Francis A. Gleeson Papers have been digitized and posted online at the UDC Digital Archive. This is a collection of papers belonging to Fr. Gleeson relating to “his time as Catholic Military Chaplain to the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers during World War I. The papers include diaries detailing life at the front and religious activities, Brigade Rolls listing mainly Roman Catholic soldiers, and correspondence from the families of men missing or killed in action.”

The material relating to “his time as Military Chaplain (1914-1919) includes diaries and Brigade Roll Books of soldiers from the Royal Munster Fusiliers and other regiments while serving in France. The diaries give an account of the horror of war in all its sufferings and privations while detailing the extraordinary importance of faith to the Irish men whose lives were daily sacrificed on the front line.”

The papers are an amazing trove of primary WWI paperwork. I spent some time reading through various letters, list and diaries and found it a bit emotionally overwhelming. The lists include names of men serving in battle, missing men, address lists of the next-of-kin of many soldiers, as no forth. If you have Irish Catholic ancestors or relatives that served in WWI, you will want to spend to researching on this site.

The following teaser is from The Independent Catholic News:

For the first time in its history, papers from the Dublin Diocesan Archive have been made digitally available for scholars, researchers and members of the public.

Experts in the Dublin Diocesan Archive and the Digital Library in University College Dublin have worked together for over a year and a half transcribing and digitising diaries and papers of Fr Francis Gleeson, a Dublin priest who ministered to soldiers in World War One.

The new digitised collection was officially launched on Monday evening (27th April) by the Archbishop of Dublin, Diarmuid Martin at a reception in Holy Cross Diocesan Centre, in Clonliffe.

The event was attended by members of Fr Gleeson’s family as well as the British and French Ambassadors to Ireland. Father Francis Gleeson, a priest of the Archdiocese of Dublin, was Chaplain to the Royal Munster Fusiliers as they faced battle on the Western Front.

Read the full article.

List-of-Men-Killed-250pw

Fr. Francis A. Gleeson Papers Description, abbreviations, and Archive Contents – with links. 30 items.

Letters – 61 files.

Diaries – 62 files.

Registers (Lists) – 118 files.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Celebrate the Scotch-Irish on St. Patrick’s Day!

The following teaser is from an excellent article posted March 16, 2015 on the Deseret News website.

Rowan-Miller-Flute-Irish-Parade-200pw

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with the invisible Irish, the Scotch-Irish. These are Scots who moved to Ireland four centuries ago, their offspring later immigrating to this country during the colonial period.

Once on these shores, the Scotch-Irish all but disappeared as a distinct group, dispersing and intermixing with other immigrant groups as they pushed westward and southward to the frontier.

Conversely, the Irish Catholic immigration was later, larger and more focused in urban areas, allowing them to retain a more distinct identity as Irish-Americans. But given that the American population was 15 percent Scotch-Irish at the time of the Revolution, there’s a good chance you may be a bit Scotch-Irish — and not even know it.

Read the full article.