County Guides to Irish Research – 25% Off Thru December 17, 2016

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As part of the 2016 FRPC 12 Days of Christmas Sale, Family Roots Publishing is offering a number of guides to Irish research at 25% off – through December 17. These excellent guidebooks are imported directly from Flyleaf press in Ireland. Over 34.5 million Americans claim ancestry originating in Ireland. Many of these folks are searching for their Irish roots. Click on the links to purchase these titles at sale prices.

Guides to Irish Research:

In-Print Guides to Irish Research – by County:

Ancestry Releases Kilmainham (Dublin) and Chelsea (London) Pension Indexes

The following Teaser is from the IrishGenealogyNews website:

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Ancestry has released a trio of indexes to military pension collections. One relates to Dublin’s Royal Hospital Kilmainham, the others to London’s Royal Hospital in Chelsea. In each case, the records on Ancestry are indexes to records transcribed from original documents; images of the documents are held on Fold3, so if you want to see them, you’ll need an Ancestry All Access subscription*.

Read the full article – with links, examples and descriptions.

AGI Returns to the Expanded Ireland National Archives Genealogy Service

The following news release is from Paul Gorry, AGI:

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Accredited Genealogists Ireland (AGI) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded the contract to provide the Genealogy Service at the National Archives of Ireland. The Genealogy Service provides free advice for those tracing their own Irish family history, whether using sources online or in the national record repositories in Dublin and Belfast, or indeed on a local level.

On Tuesday 1 November AGI returned to the Genealogy Service after a break of four years. At the same time the service was extended from a half-day to a full-day format, opening from 9.30am to 5.00pm, with a 30 minute lunch break. Each day one of AGI’s panel of fully accredited genealogists is on hand to help and assist with genealogical enquiries, from the most basic to the most complex.

The Genealogy Service at the National Archives began in 2003 when the NAI invited AGI (then called the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland) to replicate a service it was already providing at the National Library. Until 2007 AGI ran both services. During that four-year period an international survey of genealogical research facilities for the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, reported ‘the most impressive guidance we saw was provided by the Genealogy Advisory Service at the National Library and the National Archives in Dublin’.

AGI regretfully withdrew from the Genealogy Service at the National Archives in 2012 and did not tender for the contract again until now. In the past few years the Genealogy Service was operated by a consortium of genealogists with AGI accreditation. On this occasion the consortium stepped down from the tendering process in deference to AGI.

To avail of this free service you must have an NAI Reader’s Ticket. To obtain a Reader’s Ticket you must bring two forms of identification (photo ID and a recent utility bill).

About Accredited Genealogists Ireland:
AGI – Accredited Genealogists Ireland (formerly the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland) this year celebrates its 30th anniversary. It was founded in Belfast in 1986. It acts as a regulating body to maintain high standards amongst its members and to protect the interests of clients. Membership is open to professional genealogists throughout the island of Ireland. Admission to membership is on the recommendation of an independent Board of Assessors.

FindMyPast Adds Over 2.8 Million records this last week

Over 2.8 million additional records were available to search at Findmypast this last week, including:

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United States Marriages
Over 2.7 million additional records have been added to our collection of United States Marriages. The new additions come from 13 different states and include significant updates from Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and Rhode Island.

The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age and residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

Duty Locations, Naval Group China, World War II, 1942-1945
Explore more than 33,000 records containing the details of military personnel who served overseas with the United States’ Naval Group China, the US Navy’s intelligence unit in China during World War II. The records consist of muster roll reports created by the Department of the Navy, U.S. Naval Group China (NGC) to record locations and changes made to ranks and rates of pay for naval personnel.

The records contained in this collection relate to those persons attached to the NGC and provide names, ranks or rates of pay, branches of service, muster roll dates of reporting or detachment, and duty locations approximately every two weeks. As such, naval officers and sailors may appear multiple times in the records, tracking changes in an individual’s location, unit, rank or rate of pay over the course of the war.

1840 U.S. Census, Revolutionary War Veterans
1840 U.S. Census, Revolutionary War Veterans contains over 21,000 records of ex-servicemen and their next of kin who were receiving pensions in 1840 for service in the Revolutionary War.

On the back of the population schedules for the 1840 census, enumerators recorded the living pensioners of the Revolutionary War as well as other military service. The lists also noted an individual’s age and the name of the head of household in which the individual lived.

New Zealand Wars, officers and men killed 1860-1870
New Zealand Wars, officers and men killed 1860-1870 consists of 193 transcripts of nominal returns of colonial officers and men who were killed in action while fighting in the Maori Wars. The Māori Wars, began as a result of contested land purchases by the colonial government.

At that time, the colonial government believed that the Māori resistance had unified to both block future land sales and deny Crown sovereignty and, as a result, the government brought in thousands of troops to combat the Māori King Movement (Kīngitanga) and possess their lands for British settlers. Each transcript will list your ancestor’s date of death, rank and corps.

New Zealand, military pensions 1900-1902
Find out if your ancestor was eligible for a military pension and uncover details of their next of kin with a collection of over 5,000 transcripts recording former servicemen who were eligible for military pensions between 1900 and 1902.

This index will not only allow you to learn if your ancestor’s rank, service number and whether they qualified for a pension, but also the name and address of their next of kin, often including the relationship between the next of kin and your ancestor.

Ireland, Royal Hibernian Military School History
Explore this 168 page document to uncover the history of the Royal Hibernian Military School in Dublin. This fascinating publication includes transcriptions from memorial inscriptions, a roll of honour from the First World War, and transcripts from both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The Royal Hibernian Military School was founded in 1765 in Phoenix Park, Dublin. Today, it is the site of St Mary’s Hospital. When the school closed in 1924, all the registers and minute books were taken to Walworth, London. However, during the Second World War, these documents were destroyed in the Blitz. The Ireland, Royal Hibernian Military school history provides a valuable substitute for the records that were lost.

Ireland Military Records</strong>
Ireland Military Records is comprised of 8 different Irish military publications and contains over 2,700 records. The collection includes memorial inscriptions, army lists from the 19th and 17th centuries as well as two volumes of popular novels written by Charles Lever.

Each record is displayed as a PDF (Portable document format). The detail found in each record will vary depending on the publication and the subject.

New Records Available To Search at FindMyPast as of Last Friday, October 28

The following is from FindMyPast:

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Over 1.8 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

United States, West Virginia Births
Containing over 35,000 records, West Virginia Births allows you to uncover details of your ancestor’s birth. These records cover the mid-nineteenth century into the early twentieth century. In addition to learning your ancestor’s birth date, you may also discover parents’ and grandparents’ names, allowing you to expand your family tree.

Each transcript will list your ancestor’s birth date, the names of both their parents and the names of both their grandparents as well as a link to an image of the original document. By following the image link, you may be able to discover additional information about your ancestor’s family. For example, the images often include a town name, nationality and race of parents, and occupation. Some registers will also provide the number this child is for the mother, which will help confirm whether your ancestor had siblings.

Utah Divorces
Utah Divorces consist of more than 177,000 records from Utah district courts covering the years 1997 to 2016. Each result includes a transcript that will reveal the date the divorce was filed, the petitioner, respondent, attorney, case type and the judgment that was reached.

Surrey Monumental Inscriptions Browse
Discover your English ancestor’s monumental inscription by browsing 32 volumes of these images of a card index to Surrey’s monumental inscriptions. The monumental inscriptions have been recorded from thousands of gravestones and memorials across Surrey.

The images show a card index of monumental inscriptions found across the county. The index is organised alphabetically by surname. The collection begins with directory A-Bard and finishes with directory Wo-Z. Each card may provide a name and death date. Others may have additional details such as a birth date, the names and death dates of other people buried in the same plot, parish, residence, names of other family members (i.e. parents, spouse, children), and age at the time of death.

Cavan Registers & Records
Cavan Registers & Records currently includes only one title: Crosserlough Census Index 1821. The 1821 census of Crosserlough, County Cavan, was taken on 28 May 1821. The Four Courts fire in Dublin destroyed the original census documents but copy was made prior to this and was safely stored in the Courthouse in Cavan before being transferred to the National Archives in Dublin.

There are just under 8,000 individuals in the 1821 census. Each entry records an individual name, age, occupation and relationship to the head of household.

Kilkenny Registers & Records
Kilkenny Registers & Records are presented as PDFs (Portable Document Format). The collection currently comprises the Castlecomer Census Index 1901 compiled in 2000 by Tom Delany from the 1901 census held at the National Archives of Ireland.

The publication is a summary of the population of Castlecomer in the 1901. It begins with an introduction and then lists the names, ages, and occupations of the all the inhabitants. On image number 204 is the beginning of an index of all the names found in the publication.

Wicklow registers & records
Wicklow registers & records is a collection of unique genealogical sources including school registers, lists of corn growers, and a 19th century petition.

Dublin Registers & Records
10 new publications have been added to our collection of Dublin Registers & Records including school registers, district & street censuses, business directories & monumental inscriptions.

Dublin Registers & Records is comprised of over 3,500 PDF images. The collection also contains parish records (baptisms, marriages, and burials) from the Church of Ireland and the majority of records will reveal your ancestor’s name, address and the names of their parents.

Irish Newspapers
Over 1.7 million new articles have been added to our collection of historic Irish newspapers. New additions have been made to existing titles including The Irish Times and The Weekly Irish Times.

PERSI Monthly Image Update Browse
Over 87,777 new images have been added to the PERiodical Source Index. The new additions have been made to 15 existing titles covering Massachusetts, Connecticut, Boston, Illinois, Maryland, Louisiana, the Huguenot Society of Pennsylvania & Confederate veterans.

FindMyPast Publishes the Second Installment of Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law Collection

The following news release is from FindMyPast. I got it on October 21, but just haven’t had the time to get it formatted and posted until today.

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· Over 48,000 additional records released in association with The National Archives
· Records document the struggles of life under martial law in Ireland and record the details of both soldiers and civilians
· New courts martial records, intelligence reports, prisoner rolls, individual cases and search & raid reports released in second installment of landmark collection

Leading family history website, FindMyPast, has today announced the online publication of over 48,000 records in the second installment of their ‘Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law, 1916-1921’ collection.

The once classified records, digitized from original documents held by The National Archives in Kew, record the struggles of life under martial law in Ireland. Consisting of more than 119,000 images, the new additions include a variety of different documents ranging from records of courts martial (both civilian and military) and intelligence reports, to case files and nominal rolls of prisoners.

The records shed new light on the period of martial law in Ireland which was declared by the Lord Lieutenant in 1916, including the War of Independence, when the British military assumed control of the executive, judiciary and legislative arms of the entire country.

They contain the names of the hundreds of people who were detained and interned in prisons across Ireland, England and Wales and tried by courts martial, including the names of prominent nationalists and elected officials. The internment files contain reports on individual detainees recording their charges, trial, and sentence as well as personal letters from prisoners or their relatives testifying to their innocence.

Reports pertaining to courts martial include statements about the offense and details of the court proceedings. A number also include witness testimonies and statements about the character of the individual on trial.

The collection reveals the efforts of the military and police to discover arms, ammunition, seditious material and individuals associated with groups such as Sinn Fein, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Volunteers and the Irish Republican Army through thousands of raids on pubs, hotels, nationalist clubhouses and homes. They document what each search revealed, including the names of anyone found on the site (and if they were questioned or arrested), and what items of interest were uncovered.

This latest installment also includes military intelligence reports on the actions of the rebels as well as reports of unarmed persons killed or wounded by the rebels. They contain details of how individuals were wounded as well as daily situation reports created by the British Army. A number of telegrams reporting the swift trials and executions of prominent leaders and discussions about what to do with the possessions of prisoners can also be found within the collection…

The collection was digitized from original records held by The National Archives in London and contains documents from their WO35 series, War Office: Army of Ireland: Administration and Easter Rising Records. It is available to search and browse.

Totaling more than 114 million records, FindMyPast has the largest Irish family history collection available online.

Brian Donovan, Head of Irish Records at FindMyPast, said:
“We are delighted to release another large tranche of records from this important period in Ireland’s history. They document more of the events of the War of Independence and the population’s interaction with the Army under the rigors of martial law. Included are prisoner lists, case files, more search reports, as well as two volumes of the courts martial of British soldiers. They provide a fascinating insight to these times as well as helping us understand motivations, actions and consequences.”

Genealogical Society of Ireland Journals & Publications Go Online at Findmypast

The following news release is from FindMyPast:

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· All Society journals from 1992 to 2016 including over 800 individual articles
· All Society publications including extensive collections of gravestone inscriptions, historic records and surname studies.
· Released online for the first time

Dublin, Ireland, October 18th 2016: Leading Family History website Findmypast, has today announced the online publication of all The’s journals dating from 1992 to 2016. The journals are now available to search as part of the PERiodical Source Index and will be joined by the expansive range of other Genealogical Society or Ireland publications over the coming weeks. The publications consists of a wide range of documents including transcripts of original records, memorial inscriptions, local and surname studies and collections of specialist sources and guides. The information dates back to 1798 and covers many counties in Ireland including Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, Laois, Louth, Offaly and Wicklow.

The release is comprised of two sets of important publications, namely:
· Journals – In 1992 the Society commenced publication of a journal. Back then it was the Dun Laoghaire Genealogical Society, but immediately expanded its remit to cover much more than the area around the Borough. It published 224 articles between then and 1999 when it changed its name to the Genealogical Society of Ireland. Since 2000 it has published over 600 articles on Irish family history including transcripts of source materials, scholarly articles, name studies and other material.

· Publications – Alongside the journals, the society has had an ambitious publishing programme. It has so far published over 40 individual volumes of source materials. Its first in 1992 was an 1837 memorial from Wicklow signed by hundreds of residents. Thereafter they have published many volumes of gravestone inscriptions and memorials, several school registers, military records, extracts from the 1821 and 1901 census returns, occupational records, information about the population in 1798, and specific family studies, and much more.

Brian Donovan, Head of Irish Records at Findmypast, comments:
“The Genealogical Society of Ireland occupies a unique position in the Irish genealogical landscape. Not only is it the largest volunteer society in the Republic, it is by far the most active, involved in campaigns, publications, international events and the promotion of the hobby of family history. It is dedicated to making the complexities of research understandable to the novice, while at the same time developing unique expertise across a range of topics. It is particularly important as a lobbyist to government for the shared interests of the genealogy sector in Ireland and opens its doors to everyone to help in this task. With all this in mind, we at Findmypast are especially pleased to see their fabulous collection of publications available to our audience. We also wish them every continuing success.”

Tom Conlon, Director, Sales and Marketing, Genealogical Society of Ireland said
“We are delighted to advance to a further stage of collaboration with Findmypast. It brings our portfolio of publications to a very much larger audience worldwide.

The range of information of genealogical interest available online continues to expand at a phenomenal rate. With a few clicks, one can find a whole range of information and records. By joining a society, members are helped to better interpret this information and to enhance their understanding of the times and circumstances in which their ancestors lived”

About Findmypast
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a Scottish-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.
Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including over 120 million Irish family history records, the largest collection online.
www.findmypast.com

About Genealogical Society of Ireland
The Society was established in 1990 to promote an awareness, appreciation and knowledge of our genealogical and heraldic heritage in Ireland and amongst her Diaspora.
It is devoted to the promotion of the study of genealogy and related subjects as educational leisure pursuits available to all in the community irrespective of age, prior-learning, background or socio-economic circumstances by organising Open Meetings, lectures, workshops, publishing genealogical material, organising group project, exhibiting at major relevant events and the provision of an Archive and Research Centre, An Daonchartlann.
The Society encourages its members, undertaking research in every county in Ireland, to make their research available to others through publication. Through its publications programme, the Society makes accessible to researchers at home and abroad many sources otherwise not available except in their original state. The collection and repatriation of genealogical material is an important function of the Society’s Archive and Research Centre, An Daonchartlann.
www.familyhistory.ie

Millions of Irish Genealogy Records Online – Free of Any Fees

The following excerpt is from 98fm.com:

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Millions of historic personal records will be available online, free of charge, from today.

The records of births, marriages and deaths are being released by the General Register Office and will be available at irishgenealogy.ie.

Interested family tree researchers will have access to Birth Records over 100 years, indexes to marriage records over 75 years and the Indexes to Death Records over 50 years.

You can also check out transcripts of all Roman Catholic smf Church of Ireland baptism, marriage and burial registers for Dublin City.

Read the full article.

Visit IrishGenealogy.ie and find your ancestors!

The List of Church of Ireland Parish Registers – Relaunched & Available Online as a Color-Coded PDF

The following excerpt is from the ireland.anglican.org website:

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The List of Church of Ireland Parish Registers has again been extensively revised and updated, and in a collaborative project between the RCB Library and the Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS), it now includes live links to parish register sources – copies, transcripts and indexes – available online.

The IGRS was founded in 1936 as a direct response to the destruction of the Public Record Office of Ireland (PROI) in June 1922 during the civil war. It was the world’s first society dedicated to the study of Irish genealogy. 2016 marks its 80th anniversary and this collaborative project is one of the ways the Society is celebrating its important milestone.

The re–launched List represents months of painstaking volunteer work by IGRS Fellow Claire Santry and should significantly assist researchers by providing them with a search tool that links easily to online information.

Go to the website and read the full article.

Vice-Presidential Nominee Tim Kaine – the Genealogist

The following excerpt is from an interesting article posted to the July 23, 2016 edition of IrishCentral.com:

Tim Kaine with wife Anne Holton
Tim Kaine with wife Anne Holton

…Kaine certainly feels Ireland in his heart. During his acceptance speech for The American Ireland Fund Leadership Award, he talked about his family’s 2006 trip to Ireland, where they found the ruins of his great-grandfather’s cottage in Killashee Parish, in Longford…

He visited Ireland during his first year as governor of Virginia, with his wife Anne and three children. They visited the ruins of the home of his great-grandfather, PJ Farrell who later emigrated to Kansas, where he became a successful farmer.

Kaine told the dinner about how his children were unhappy with leaving “cool” Dublin to search for his family roots in County Longford.

“As we drove to Longford, which isn’t exactly the tourist zone, they continued to complain,” he said.

He also has Kilkenny root, which makes him the exception, as most Irish roots go back to the traditional Irish western seaboard counties like Mayo, Galway, and Kerry.

Read the full article.

The National Library of Ireland is Archiving the Irish Internet

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Fascinating… I had not spent much time thinking about the archiving of all these internet postings we do. The following excerpt is from a good article posted July 22, 2016 at The Irish Times.

With about 10 million objects from nearly 1,000 years of Irish history, archiving the internet isn’t the first thing that jumps to mind about the National Library of Ireland.

Nestled in the centre of Kildare Street since 1890, the Library’s treasured materials constitute the most comprehensive collection of Irish documentary material on the planet. But what of its future? If, say, our distant descendants wanted to research what life was like for us all way back in 2016 – say February’s general election, or even last year’s Marriage Equality referendum, with all their social media feeds in-tow – internet archives will likely be their default option.

“How we are collecting in the National Library is obviously changing, but it’s the same principles,” says Maria Ryan, a web archivist in the Digital Collections Department. “What newspapers were 20 years ago, websites are now. So we’ve recognised that need to collect and preserve that information for the people of Ireland, but in an ever-evolving form.”

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

10 Million New Irish Catholic Parish Registers With FREE Access Through March 7, 2016!

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The following was received from FindMyPast:

We’re excited to reveal the launch of 10 million new Irish Catholic Parish Registers on Findmypast today. Covering the majority of Ireland, this incredible record set includes 40 million names, 3,500 registers and over 1,000 parishes. To celebrate, we’re making all 110 million Irish records free for everyone until 7th March. Click on the links or on the illustration to search.

National Archives of Ireland to Get an Upgrade

The following teaser was posted January 20, 2015 at independent.ie:

Heather Humphreys looking at documents in the National Archives, Bishop Street, Dublin 8. Photo: Douglas O'Connor.
Heather Humphreys looking at documents in the National Archives, Bishop Street, Dublin 8. Photo: Douglas O’Connor.

Some four million State files are set to have a new home as part of a new €8m redevelopment of the National Archives of Ireland.

The design and construction phase at the archives’ Dublin headquarters in Bishop Street will begin later this year, and will see an estimated 100 million pages stored in more suitable conditions.

It is also hoped the investment will allow for sufficient storage to accommodate a change to a 20-year rule for the release of State papers.

Launching the plans, Arts Minister Heather Humphreys said the expansion would transform the building into a “state-of-the-art” facility.

Read the full article.

Patricia Moorhead Appointed Emeritus Member of AGI

The following is from AGI:

Patricia Moorhead (right) with AGI colleagues Michael Walsh and Máire Mac Conghail (AGI President).
Patricia Moorhead (right) with AGI colleagues Michael Walsh and Máire Mac Conghail (AGI President).

Accredited Genealogists Ireland (AGI) is pleased to announce that its very first Emeritus Member is Patricia Moorhead. She is a popular figure in Irish genealogy, known particularly for her witty and entertaining talks. Pat, as she is familiarly known to her friends, has been involved in family history research for over two decades. She was passed by the APGI (now AGI) assessors in 1999 and retained membership until a year ago, when she chose to retire.

At AGI’s Annual General Meeting in December 2015 a constitutional amendment was passed, allowing the Council to confer emeritus status on members or associate members who have retired. The status is not automatic on retirement. It recognised a long and valued association with AGI. Immediately after the AGM, a Council meeting was held at which Patricia Moorhead was named as the first person to receive Emeritus Membership. The decision was announced later that day at the annual lunch.

Back in the 1990s Mrs. Moorhead completed the diploma in Local History at NUI Maynooth and the Certificate in Genealogy at UCD, under the instruction of Sean Murphy. She took an active role in the Irish Genealogical Congress from 1994 and joined the committee of the Irish Family History Society in 1995. As well as having a career as a professional genealogist, Pat devoted much time to researching a relative who was awarded the Victoria Cross. Many of her projects led to fascinating and extraordinary coincidences, and to lectures that captivated and entertained her listeners. Though retired, she intends to keep up contact with her colleagues by attending AGI events.

About Accredited Genealogists Ireland:
AGI – Accredited Genealogists Ireland (formerly the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland) was founded in Belfast in 1986. It acts as a regulating body to maintain high standards amongst its members and to protect the interests of clients. Membership is open to professional genealogists throughout the island of Ireland. Admission to membership is on the recommendation of an independent Board of Assessors.

NEW – Tracing Your Donegal Ancestors, 3rd Edition – On Sale for 15% off Thru Sept. 1

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Flyleaf Press has a new 3rd edition of Tracing your Donegal Ancestors, written by Godfrey F. Duffy & Helen Meehan. FRPC just got in a stock from Dublin, Ireland. We’re making them available for 15% off thru Sept 1, 2015. Click on the illustration or the links to order.

In comparison with most other Irish counties, Donegal has fewer records of value to family historians. This makes it important to use the existing records to their best advantage. Donegal families are a mixture of native Gaelic families, and of Scots-Irish families who came to Donegal from the 17th century onward.

Common names in the county include O’Neill, O’Donnell, Bonner, Barr, Bradley, Duffy, Friel, Gormley, O’Kane, Gallagher, Harkin, McBride, McCafferty, McDaid, Patton, Morrissey, Ward and Sweeney.

County Donegal is one of the counties which experienced a high level of emigration to North America and elsewhere. This book sets out the records available for Donegal, where they can be accessed, and how they can be used to best effect in tracing Donegal families.

Reviews
” ..a valuable addition to Flyleaf’s excellent series of Irish county guides. It achieves its task…though a combination of lucid exposition and examples from the relevant sources. The most impressive facet of the book is its comprehensive coverage… With its superb bibliography and logical layout this represents excellent value for money and is a must for anyone with Donegal ancestors” – Who do you Think you are Magazine

” The publication is one of a kind and does all the correct things required of such a book, directions to availability of vital data, examples of such data and all other relevant information which will steer the beginner and the more experienced researcher when searching for Donegal ancestors. ” – Irish Family History Society

” The authors are natives of the county and experienced genealogists who guide the reader through the various sources of information…(and)… explain in a straightforward way how to go about investigating your Donegal Ancestry. Anyone starting out for the first time will find this an invaluable resource ” – Books Ireland

” This new and greatly expanded edition sets out the range of Donegal genealogical sources available to the family history researcher, devoting a chapter to each source type explaining what information each contains, and where each record can be accessed.” – Irish World (UK)

” The most impressive facet of the book is its comprehensive coverage… With its superb bibliography and logical layout this represents excellent value for money and is a must for anyone with Donegal ancestors.” – Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine January 2009

” This new and greatly expanded edition sets out the range of Donegal genealogical sources available to the family history researcher, devoting a chapter to each source type explaining what information each contains, and where each record can be accessed.” – Irish World (UK)

Tracing your Donegal Ancestors, 3rd Edition; by Godfrey F. Duffy & Helen Meehan; 161 pp; Paperback; 5.75×9; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781907990229; Illustrated; Item # FLP003.

Click on the link to order your copy. On sale for 15% off through September 1, 2015