100 Best Photographs Without Photoshop

Super-moon

Warning – this entry has nothing to do with genealogy – but it’s worth reading.

My good friend, Sam Colorassi, sent me a link that really made my day. It’s titled the 100 best photographs without photoshop. It takes a while to scroll through the photos, as you will find yourself stopping and having “ahh” moments. I invite you to check it out. Enjoy!

The National Archives Announces Partnership to Digitize WWII Aerial Photography

The following is from the National Archives Press/Journalists webpage.

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November 2, 2015 Washington, DC… The National Archives today announced its partnership with the National Collection of Aerial Photography (NCAP) to digitize historic World War II aerial photography. For the first time, these historically valuable images will be made accessible online to anyone, anywhere.

This partnership marks the first digitization of the National Archives’ aerial film holdings. Under the partnership, NCAP will digitize more than 150,000 canisters of aerial film from the National Archives’ records of the Defense Intelligence Agency. These aerial photographs were taken by the U.S. Navy and Air Force for military reconnaissance and mapping projects.

More than 40,000 canisters of World War II aerial film will be the focus of digitization under the first stage of the five year pilot project. Once digitized, the public will be able to access these materials free of charge from National Archives research facilities nationwide. The National Archives will receive a copy of the digital images and metadata for inclusion in its online catalog.

The National Archives works with partners to digitize and make available National Archives holdings. These digitization partnerships provide increased access to historical government information through the increased availability of information technology products and services. See NARA’s Principles for Partnerships for more information. A list of current partnerships is online.

The National Collection of Aerial Photography (NCAP), based in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, holds one of the largest collections of aerial imagery in the world, estimated at more than 25 million aerial photographs. NCAP collects such records, in both digital and physical formats, to preserve them for generations to come, and to make them widely accessible. NCAP’s online digitized collection, valued by historians and researchers, is also used to help locate unexploded bombs from World War II and to identify contaminated land where development is being planned throughout Europe.

The U.S. National Archives is an independent Federal agency that preserves and shares with the public records that trace the story of our nation, government, and the American people. From the Declaration of Independence to accounts of ordinary Americans, the holdings of the National Archives directly touch the lives of millions of people. The National Archives carries out its mission through a nationwide network of archives, records centers, and Presidential Libraries, and online.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Ellis Island Immigrants – The Photographs

The following teaser in from an excellent article posted October 28, 2015 at the fstoppers.com website.

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From 1892 to 1925, Augustus Sherman, the chief registry clerk of Ellis Island, took photographs of immigrants as they arrived in the United States. The photographs are striking for their display of the vast array of cultural backgrounds that passed through on their way to becoming citizens of the U.S. Take a look at some of the history contained in this archive.

Originally published by National Geographic in 1907, this treasure trove eventually passed on to the headquarters of the Immigration Service in Manhattan, before arriving at its current home in the New York Public Library, which graciously made many of the prints available online.

Read the full article and view the photos.

Is This a Genuine Picture of Bob Ford and Jesse James?

The following teaser is from an article posted October 22, 2015 at the CNN website.

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CNN – A Houston forensic artist says she’s sure an old tintype owned by a Washington state family is that of Jesse James and his eventual killer, Robert Ford.

“This photo was taken when the two men trusted each other and the younger Robert Ford wanted a picture of himself with the man who had become a legend in his own time,” Lois Gibson said on her Facebook page.

The undated photo shows both men seated on chairs next to each other, with Ford on James’ right.

Read the full article.

Digital Archive of Life at Mount Holyoke College in the Early 20th-Century

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Mount Holyoke College, the liberal arts educational institution for women in South Hadley, Massachusetts, has debuted a new online digital archive of about 2,000 rare photographs. The collection documents life at the college from 1899 to 1939. The photographs include pictures of the campus and community and women in a wide variety of academic and extracurricular activities.

The images were taken by Asa Kinney, a professor of botany at the college during the period.

The digital archive may be accessed here.

The above excerpt is from WIA Report. Click here for the full article, and to view a video.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Bluesky Brings Old British Aerial Photos Online

The following press release is from directionsmagazine.com:

View the History of Britain from the Air as Bluesky Brings Old Aerial Photos Online
Thousands of aerial photographs of Britain, dating back more than seventy years, are now available online. Visitors to www.blueskymapshop.com can now search, view and download images from the Old Aerial Photos collection, which includes some of the earliest commercial aerial survey images, military photographs as well as many national archives. Offering a record of most major UK cities and towns, transport and utility infrastructure and commercial property developments, the images are an invaluable resource for anyone with a personal or professional interest in local studies, genealogy, boundary disputes, environmental land use research or town planning.

“Our Mapshop is already established as to the ‘go to’ place for modern aerial photography, with multiple dates of imagery available for the whole of England, Scotland and Wales,” says Rachel Tidmarsh, Managing Director of Bluesky. “The addition of the Old Aerial Photos archive was therefore the next step. Complementing the modern images, as well as the other map layers available, this archive is a really interesting and valuable resource for a range of applications.”

The Old Aerial Photos archive of historic aerial images includes around 100,000 individual images dating back to the 1960s. The newly available images include archives from some of the forerunners of today’s aerial photography industry as well as photographs from the UK military. Visitors to www.blueskymapshop.com can also access archive images from more familiar names such as Infoterra, GeoPerspectives and SCRAN (formerly BLOM).

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The online archive can be searched using a postcode, street or city name, or Ordnance Survey grid reference. Once the Old Aerial Photos option has been selected the Bluesky Mapshop viewer window then displays small camera icons for each image available within the search area. Clicking on an icon displays a preview of the aerial image as well as information about the photograph including when it was taken.

By clicking through to the ‘Choose your product’ page, the visitor can get an overview of all products available within the search area before selecting the Old Aerial Photos option. Details of each image, including scale, date and price, are displayed and the visitor can choose different purchase options, such as Standard Scan or Archive Pack, accompanying Letter of Authenticity, Printed Version and Delivery Option.

Contacts: Bluesky, tel +44 (0)1530 518 518, www.blueskymapshop.com, www.bluesky-world.com

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

New Akron, Ohio Photo Archive – Free For the Public’s Use

The following teaser is from Ohio.com:

An online treasure trove of photographs of Akron is now available — for free use by anyone — thanks to local photographer Shane Wynn and two nonprofits who work to give the city a boost.

Wynn spent more than 40 hours last year taking the shots, capturing more than 1,400 images of the city, including wide-angle photos taken from the tops of parking decks and a ladder.

These are beauty shots, showcasing Akron’s downtown and other parts of the city.

The archive, supported by the Downtown Akron Partnership and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, is open to any organization, business or individual at www.Akronstock.com.

Akron Ohio Northside Lofts -  Click on the Image to see details and browse the Akron Images.
Akron Ohio Northside Lofts – Click on the Image to see details and browse the Akron Images.

Read the full article.

Thanks to Research-Buzz for the Heads-Up.

Savannah, Georgia Digital Images Now Available Online

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The Blog of the Digital Library of Georgia has announced that the City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives, through its online Digital Image Catalog, has made public all kinds of historic Savannah, Georgia digital images. Following is a teaser from an article on the blog:

The City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives has recently made a new collection available through its online Digital Image Catalog: Public Information Office–Photographs, 1948-2000.

This collection contains digitized photographs, slides, negatives, and manuscript material maintained by the city of Savannah’s Public Information Office, and document city-sponsored services, programs, and significant city events. There are also photographs of politicians and employees of city bureaus.

Images in the collection were used in both internal publications that included reports, newsletters, and identification materials, and promotional materials that advertised city services and programs…

Read the full article.

Search the the City of Savannah Research Library and Municipal Archives site.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

100,000 Original Mali Photographs to be Digitized

The following teaser is from an article posted April 21, 2015 at the Michigan State University website.

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Hoping to preserve cultural heritage and change Western thought on Africa, a Michigan State University researcher will use a $300,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to digitize 100,000 original black-and-white negatives of Mali’s most important photographers, dating from the 1940s.

Candace Keller, assistant professor of African art history and visual culture, is collaborating with MSU’s MATRIX: The Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences and the Maison Africaine de la Photographie in Bamako, Mali, to create the Archive of Malian Photography.

Once complete, the publicly accessible, free database will provide valuable documentation of the modernization of Western Africa, featuring family portraits and photos of military activities, diplomatic visits, political events, national monuments, architecture, cultural and religious ceremonies and other aspects of popular culture, she said.

Read the full article.

Digital Imaging Essentials: Techniques & Tips for Genealogists and Family Historians- with FREE PDF- 20% Off

From scanner or camera, digital images, namely photographs, have become a part of everyday life. Even older photographs, on paper or film, are commonly converted to digital format. Documents, letters, notes, books, and just about anything else on paper can be scanned and preserved in digital format. This include vital records. Opinions vary widely on what equipment you need, and what formats to save in, and what software to use, but in the end it comes down to just a little bit of knowledge and some basic skills. Anyone can learn these skills. Years of practice, along with plenty of mistakes, can make an expert out of just about anyone. Geoffrey Rasmussen, from Legacy Family Tree, has experienced his own woes over the years. More importantly, he has learned many useful lessons to successful digital imaging. These lessons are shared in his voice and straightforward way through his book Digital Imaging Essentials: Technique and Tips for Genealogists and Family Historians.

Geoff helps answer age old questions, like which scanner to buy? He reviews the ever nagging questions of picture resolution and file format. He also covers basic skills like importing images from scanner or camera, editing those images, and, of course, organizing, sharing, and backing up. Listing from the back, here is what “You Will Learn:

  • The do-it-right-the-first-time techniques of scanning old documents, and snapping pictures with your digital camera.
  • How to finally get organized so that you can locate any digital image in under a minute.
  • Which file formats and file saving techniques to use to properly preserve your digital images.
  • How to use Adobe’s Photoshop Elements and Google’s Picasa with illustrated, step-by-step instructions and learn about other software choices.
  • How to privately or publicly share your images and videos via printing, emailing, Dropbox, CDs, DVDs, or online via cloud technology.
  • How to access your digital media from any Internet-connected device including your smart phone or tablet.
  • How to develop a backup strategy to protect your collections from digital disaster.”

While Geoff tackles some of the oldest questions in digital imaging, he does so using the latest software and techniques. From hardware to software and from the local hard drive to the Internet, Geoff discusses what is available today. What makes this book so great is the clear and precise way Geoff handles each topic. His opinions are well thought out and come from his vast experience. The step-by-step instructions are easy to follow. This book is truly designed to make learning easy. As Geoff says, “So if you are ready to take your digital pictures to the next level, go ahead, open the book, and have fun!”

 

Contents

Foreword

Preface

Chapter 1: A Digital Image is…

Chapter 2: Before You Digitize

  • What will you do with the digital images?
  • Resolution
  • File Formats

Chapter 3: Scanners, Cameras, Wi-Fi, Mi-Fi, and Eye-Fi

  • Which Scanners?
  • All-in-one
  • Flat-bed
  • Flip-Pal mobile scanner
  • Wand scanners
  • What to look for in a digital camera
  • Resolution
  • Zoom
  • JPG vs TIF
  • Wireless
  • Image Stabilization
  • Tripod vs. a steady hand

Chapter 4: Photo Software

  • Photoshop Elements
  • Picasa
  • Other popular photo software

Chapter 5: How to Import from your Scanner or Camera

  • 4 Steps to digitizing a photograph or document using a Flat-bed scanner
  • Creating a unique file name
  • 3 Steps to digitizing a photograph or document using the Flip-Pal mobile scanner
  • 2 Steps to Transferring a Photograph from your Digital Camera to Your Computer

Chapter 6: Before Editing the Picture

Chapter 7: Auto-Editing Techniques

  • Photoshop Elements techniques
  • Picasa techniques

Chapter 8: Editing: Advanced Tips and Techniques

  • Clone
  • Fixing little scratches and blemishes
  • Replace the background
  • How to “colorize” a black/white photo
  • Stitching
  • How to selectively adjust dark areas of a picture

Chapter 9: Getting Organized

  • My Personal Photographs and Scanned Images
  • My Digital Genealogy Documents
  • Another Golden Rule
  • Photo Organizing Software
  • Keyword tags, and facial recognition
  • Compatibility of tags

Chapter 10: Sharing

  • Printing and mailing
  • Emailing
  • Email feature of your photo editing software
  • You can still send a large attachment
  • How to add a citation to a digital image
  • CDs and DVDs
  • Adobe Premiere Elements
  • The Cloud
  • 4 Steps to Sharing via a the Cloud
  • Picasa Web Albums – anywhere

Chapter 11: Backup Strategies

  • External hard drive or another internal hard drive
  • Cloud services
  • CDs/DVDs
  • Photo Books

Conclusion

Index

 

All soft-bound copies of Digital Imaging Essentials: Techniques and Tips for Genealogists and Family Historians ordered from Family Roots Publishing currently come with a FREE immediately available download of a full-color pdf version of the book. On Sale for just $15.96 through Monday, April 20, 2015. Reg. price: $19.95

This book is also available in an electronic pdf format ($14.95 with no postage fees).

Library of Congress Acquires Rare Civil War Stereographs

The following is from News from the Library of Congress:

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March 31, 2015: Selection of Images Now Online

The Library of Congress has acquired 540 rare and historic Civil War stereographs from the Robin G. Stanford Collection. The first 77 images are now online, including 12 stereographs of President Lincoln’s funeral procession through several cities and 65 images by Southern photographers showing South Carolina in 1860-61.

The images can be viewed in this gallery within the Library’s Prints and Photographs Online Catalog. More images will be added each month, until all are online.

The Library of Congress acquired the collection through a purchase/gift from Robin G. Stanford of Houston, Texas. During the past 40 years, Stanford has collected stereographs of both the Civil War and Texas. Through the assistance of the Center for Civil War Photography and retired Library of Congress curator Carol Johnson, the Library was allowed to select images that significantly improve its representation of the war and of life in mid-19th-century America. The center has also funded the digitizing of the first group of stereographs.

“I’m delighted that the Library of Congress has agreed to acquire my collection,” said Stanford. “I feel that the Library is the perfect home for the images, an ultra-safe and secure place where they will be fully accessible, not only now, but for future generations to come.”

Helena Zinkham, chief of the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress, said “Mrs. Stanford offered the Library an exceptional opportunity to fill key gaps in our holdings by making available selections from her unparalleled collection of American Civil War stereographs.”

The Library’s Prints and Photographs Division is a premiere research center for access to original Civil War pictures. But most of the documentary photographs were made by such master Northern photographers as Alexander Gardner and the Mathew Brady Studio.

“We have critical gaps in our Southern stereographs and in images by local photographers in both North and South. The Stanford Collection can provide scenes with slaves in 1860 South Carolina, views in Louisiana and Texas, rare coverage of naval and land battles, small Pennsylvania battlefront towns and much more,” said Zinkham. “The Library has long sought to expand its coverage of the war. At the start of the Civil War 150th anniversary years, the Liljenquist Collection brought remarkable portraiture of enlisted men, both Confederate and Union. As the anniversary years conclude, the Stanford Collection adds rare views of the South made by the people who lived there. Together, these collections can fuel new research for years to come.”

The 77 images now online include 12 from Lincoln’s funeral procession through cities, including Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Springfield, Illinois. The images show the president’s casket in elaborate open-air hearses that passed through the main streets of the cities; buildings draped in mourning bunting; and crowds lined up to see the procession.

The other 65 images are stereograph photos taken by James M. Osborn and Frederick E. Durbec, who operated a photography business, “Osborn & Durbec’s Southern Stereoscopic & Photographic Depot” on King Street in Charleston, South Carolina, from about 1859 to1863. The stereo photos show scenes from South Carolina in 1860-61, including slaves living and working at Rockville Plantation; Fort Sumter after bombardment; Fort Moultrie; and the Charleston Battery.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division holds more than 15 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day. International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history. For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 158 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats. The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.

19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide: A Step-by-Step Guide to Identifying and Dating Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards

Card PhotosPhotography, like any other “technology” has advanced in many distinct ways over it nearly 200 years of existence. In 1839 the commercial use of photography became a reality, and many different methods were tried and used to create permanent images. From metal and glass to paper and film, and ultimately digital media, the process for capturing and preserving images has changed and improved numerous times. For every major change in photo technology there have also been numerous more minor changes. With a little knowledge, one can learn to identify these different photo types and date their origin to within a few years.

Around the world, there are innumerable photographs of people, of ancestors, who are unidentified by name and date. Whether on a desk, in a drawer or closet, stuffed in envelopes, photo albums or stacked in a box, these images are waiting to be identified. One of the most heavily used, of the 19th century photographic methods, were paper-based photographs glued to cartes de visite and cabinet cards. If you have ever seen a photo of your ancestors from the late 1800s to early 1900s, it is a good chance the picture was one of these two types of images.

Gary W. Clark has created a guide to help researchers identify and date these images to within a few years of their actual origin. 19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide: A Step-by-Step Guide to Identifying and Dating Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards covers both the history of these photographic technique along with a series of clues to help the reader date a card to within a few years, and sometimes, within a few miles of its origin. By evaluating the materials and methods of printing, where and style of the photographers imprints, the background choice, props, clothing, etc. researchers uncover clues as to a photos origins. If you have a image of an unnamed individual, but can place the photo to a relative time and place, there is a good chance you can user other bits of know family information to name the person in the picture.

Learning to identify and date card photos may just be the skill you need to bringing your ancestors to life, and into your life.

 

Contents

Introduction

Defining the Card Photograph

Why Study Old Photographs?

Protecting Your Old Photographs

Chapter 1 ~ A Brief History of Photography

The Paper Revolution Begins

Mass Production and Social Influences

Historical Review

Chapter 2 ~ Cartes de Visite

Historical Review

Cartes de Visite in America

Clue #1 ~ Card Thickness & Size

Clue #2 ~ Card Borders & Frames

Clue #3 ~ Corners, Edges, and Color

Clue #4 ~ Photographer Imprints

Clue #5 ~ Subject Image Size

Clue #6 ~ Federal Tax Stamps

Clue #7  ~ Hair and Fashion

Clue #8 ~ Studio Backgrounds & Props

Cartes de visite from Around the World

Carte de visite Checklist

Chapter 3 ~ Cabinet Cards

Historical Review

From Rustic to Elegant

Dating the Cabinet Card

Clue #1 ~ Card Edges

Clue #2 ~ Card Borders

Clue #3 ~ Card Colors

Clue #4 ~ Photographer Imprints

Clue #5 ~ Gelatin and Collodion Papers

Clue #6 ~ Special Effects

Clue #7  ~ Fashion and Clothes

Clue #8 ~ Studio Backgrounds & Props

Cabinet Card Review

Cabinet Cards Around the World

Cabinet Card Checklist

Chapter 4 ~ Studio Props

Infatuation with Studio Props

1880s – Crowded Cabinet Cards

Chapter 5 ~Unique Photograph Formats

Unique Sizes & Formats of the 19th Century

Chapter 6 ~20th Century Photograph Introduction

The Modern Photograph Era

Appendix A ~ Common Card Sizes

Appendix B ~ Research Website

Appendix C ~ Glossary

Notes

Index

 

19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide: A Step-by-Step Guide to Identifying and Dating Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards  is available from Family Roots Publishing.

Gary’s KwikTips guides make excellent additions to this book. Each guide serves as a reminder, or easy-to-take-along reference, to the identification skills taught in this book. Click the titles below for more information on each:

 

About the Author
Gary Clark is a professional photographer, restorer, and genealogist who has merged these skills with his passion for collecting photographs. His 30 years of experience in digital imaging brings a unique and thorough understanding of photograph problems and how to solve them. Clark introduced PhotoTree.com to genealogists and collectors in 2000, and he continually expands the free information with a gallery of over 1,000 images, weekly case studies, and historical information about 19th century photographs

Bundle of 3 Valuable Old Photo KwikGuides Discounted 15% Thru Aug. 23

Family Roots Publishing Company has put together a bundle of the three popular Kwikguides used to date, identify, and get lots of useful historical information on your old photos – making them available at a discounted price with one low shipping fee. The bundle includes:

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19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide: A: Step-by-Step Guide to Identifying and Dating Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards; by Gary W. Clark; 2013; ISBN: 978-0-9835785-5-0; 8.5×11; Soft cover – perfect bound; full color; 92 pp; ISBN #:9780983578550; Item #GC06

19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide presents a fun, interesting and easy-to-follow set of clues that guides genealogists, historians, and other researchers through the task of dating their card photographs from the 1800s. With over 200 high quality documented photographs included as examples for every clue, the researcher can accurately determine most photograph dates within two to six years.

This book illustrates photographic technology changes that occurred frequently throughout the 19th century. These changes are verified, tracked, and dated, providing a time line of identifiable characteristics. Traditional reviews of style and fashion are also included, many with new insight.

Informative chapters include:

  1. History of Photographs
  2. Cartes de visite
  3. Cabinet Cards
  4. Studio Props
  5. Unique Formats
  6. 20th Century Photographs
  7. and more.

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Cased Images & Tintypes KwikGuide: A Guide to Identifying and Dating Dauerreotypes, Ambrotypes, and Tintypes.

Like his other books, Clark provides a brief history to the time and place these image types were in use, you learn about and how to date images, and you get a detailed coverage of the various image types. Topics include:

  • Daguerreotype Case Styles
  • Ambrotype Glass Types
  • Cased Tintype Images
  • Paper Sleeves and Mounts
  • Background and Studio Props
  • Fashion and Style

Above all other types of images, these reflect the true origins of commercial photography. These images are becoming increasingly rare with age; yet, many can still find photos of ancestors locked away in attics, basements and boxes the world over. These images are treasures for both their increase rarity and for their personal value to the family historian.

Learning to identify and date card photos may just be the skill you need to bringing your ancestors to life, and into your life.

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Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide, a Guide to Identifying and dating Real Photo Postcards of the 20th Century; by Gary W. Clark; 96 pp; Softcover; Published: 2013; 8.5×11; ISBN: 9780983578581; Item # GC07

The only book for genealogists and historians that focuses on dating Real Photo Postcards or RPPCs as they are frequently called. Find the information you need to establish a close date of when the postcard was made.

Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide is a fun guide to the popular postcards in the early 20th century. This guide is a required reading for genealogists, family historians, postcard collectors, and vintage photograph enthusiasts. The KwikGuide presents a short history of all postcards and then covers Real Photo Postcards in detail, including how to recognize and date them.

Dating postcards is important to understanding who the subjects in the picture may be. For collectors, determining the date of a photograph may help understand the rarity and value of a postcard. Typical clues for dating postcards such as stamps, stamp boxes, and card format are illustrated with fine images from the PhotoTree.com collection.

Informative chapters include:

  • History of Postcards
  • Stamps and Stamp Boxes
  • Postcard Size and Formats
  • Postcard Galleries
  • Fashion and Style
  • The Demise of Photo Postcards
  • . . . and more.

A companion website allows the reader to view high resolution, color images found in the Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide.

About the Author

Gary Clark is a professional photographer, restorer, and genealogist who has merged these skills with his passion for collecting photographs. His 30 years of experience in digital imaging brings a unique and thorough understanding of photograph problems and how to solve them. Clark introduced PhotoTree.com to genealogists and collectors in 2000, and he continually expands the free information with a gallery of over 1,000 images, weekly case studies, and historical information about 19th century photographs.

Purchase this bundle today for 15% off, only $38.97 (plus $5.50 p&h).

Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide: A Guide to Identifying and Dating Real Photo Postcards of the 20th Century

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In 2013, Gary Clark, of PhotoTree.com, had a very busy year. He seemed to be on a one-man mission to provide every detail a genealogist will need to identify, date, and restore old photographs of virtually every type and in a way to make the process as easy as possible. This was a lot of ground to cover, but Gary seemed well on his way. Following are two other earlier books and three laminated guides he produced, as follows:

Following is a review that Ancdy Pomeroy wrote in 2013:

Gary has another easy to follow guide, Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide: A Guide to Identifying and Dating Real Photo Postcards of the 20th Century. This new guide looks into the rise and fall of the real photo postcard. Inside the reader will discover two main elements to helping them identify and date these cards. These postcards can be examined in terms of the structure and style  of the card itself, as well as applying all the normal techniques for dating and identifying photographs. Here are just some of the items the reader will learn to examine for clues:

  • Address format
  • Stamp boxes and artwork
  • Regular and commemorative stamps
  • Image styles and sizes
  • Manufacturing clues
  • and so much more…

Flipping through the pages, the first thing I noticed was how many clear and easy to read samples there are. I don’t think there is a page in the guide that doesn’t have a picture, some have many images. I feel like running out and buy old photo postcards of just anyone, so I can test what I have learned. Making this book even better, it offers my four favorite things in a guidebook:

  1. Easy to read
  2. Easy to follow and adapt
  3. Clear examples and images
  4. Inexpensive

About the Author
Gary Clark is a professional photographer, restorer, and genealogist who has merged these skills with his passion for collecting photographs. His 30 years of experience in digital imaging brings a unique and thorough understanding of photograph problems and how to solve them. Clark introduced PhotoTree.com to genealogists and collectors in 2000, and he continually expands the free information with a gallery of over 1,000 images, weekly case studies, and historical information about 19th century photographs.

 

This guide gives a lot of bang for your buck. Order Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide: A Guide to Identifying and Dating Real Photo Postcards of the 20th Century from Family Roots Publishing for only $9.75 a copy.

 

Contents

Introduction

Identifying People in Postcards

Introduction to Real Photo Postcards

Definition of Real Photo Postcards (RPPC)

Chapter 1 ~ Government Postcards

First U.S. Postal Postcards: 1873

Government Monopoly Until 1898

Chapter 2 ~ Private Mailing Cards

Private Mailing Cards – 1898

Chapter 3 ~ The Postcard Rage

New Postcard Name – 1902

RFD – Rural Free Delivery – 1902

Chapter 4 ~ The Modern Postcard

Divided Back: 1907 – A Lasting Change

Slow Transition to Messages on the Back

The Golden Era Begins

Chapter 5 ~ Stamp Boxes and Stamps

Clues From Postcard Manufacturers

Photographic Paper Changes

Stamp Box Gallery

U.S. Postal Stamps

Chapter 6 ~ Image Styles and sizes

Picture Masks

Use of Masks on Postcards

Postcard Image Sizes

Chapter 7 ~ Fashion and Style

20th Century Fashion Influence

Chapter 8 ~ Cars, Farms, and Gatherings

Postcards of America

Chapter 9 ~ The Demise of RPPCs

Pressures on Real Photo Cards

Appendix A ~ Early Kodak Cameras

Appendix B ~ Common Film Sizes

Appendix C ~ Postcard and Camera Influence

A Look at the Early 20th Century

Appendix D ~ Glossary

Notes

Index

Forensic Genealogy – Revised

ya006Forensic Genealogy – Revised was written to help genealogists dig deeper, examining sources with greater scrutiny to achieve greater success.

Usually, when someone is said to be wearing the proverbial rose-colored glasses they are said to be viewing the world, or a situations, as better than it really is. The idiom suggests not positive thinking but rather a choice to ignore the hardships of reality. However, I used to teach a class on Internet research in which I took the rose-colored glasses concept and flipped it over. Sometimes researchers need take pause, evaluate their progress and reconsider their evidence. In other words, put on some rose-colored glasses and gain a new perspective. Sometimes a different perspective, a new way of looking at information, is just what the researcher needs to take the next step. Analyzing resources in a new way, with deeper understanding, may lead to new areas of research and greater success.

Colleen Fitzpatrick wrote the original Forensic Genealogy. This time around, Dr. Fitzpatrick teams up with Andrew Yeiser to update and extend the volume; including, what is probably the most up-to-date information in print on genealogical DNA research.

This book is divided into three key sections, similar to those a forensic scientist would use, analyzing photographs, mining databases for information, and DNA studies. Fitzpatrick helps the reader see these tasks in a different light. She hopes that through the book the reader will come to:

  • use unconventional tools to make surprising discoveries
  • gain an understanding of how your ancestors lived
  • develop fascinating insights into your family history

An investigative journalist once taught me the value of reevaluating your resources, looking for what fits or doesn’t fit, to put on the rose-colored glasses, and to follow the paper trail. He told me the best genealogists learn to think like investigators. Forensic Genealogy is your investigator’s handbook. This guide goes deep into forensic analysis often missed in other books. For example, most books discuss dating a photograph by the material it is on, the clothing being worn, and hairdos. Fitzpatrick warns of problems with such analysis. Hairdos didn’t always proclaim a specific time period. Clothing, especially for children, was often handed down. Older relatives may suffer from memory lapses, providing incorrect information about photographs. The author points out often pictures can be evaluated to determine the type of camera used and the placement of logos on the back can suggest time periods. These and other observations, when understood, can lend strength to or improve upon evaluations of photographs, or any other information source.

If the example seems to obvious, consider some of the other sources the author has used; including, “five hundred year old weather patterns, information on the breeding cycle of mosquitoes, old almanacs, how babies were delivered in the middle ages, old hospital admission records, the 1909 National Cash Register catalog, the history of the railroad in Canada, the backs of photographic prints form the 1950s, the history of the Spanish Armada,” and more.

The book comes with a bonus CD described as follows:

“This Forensic Genealogy CD is meant to supplement the information found in the accompanying book.  For those of you who are avid photo-detectives, there are higher resolution color versions of the photos found in the chapter The Digital Detective. For in-depth photo analysis, there is a premade spreadsheet for calculating the time of day and the day of the year when a picture was taken, based on the size of a shadow relative to the size of the object creating it, and the latitude of the location where it was taken.

There are fascinating excerpts drawn from unusual databases to tease the Database Detectives in the audience.  Although these samples are drawn primarily from New Orleans records, similar information can be found relating to many other cities and towns and covering other periods of time.

The DNA spreadsheets are interactive and allow you to see the effects of varying the parameters for Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) calculations.  They are based on the binomial expansion and the Poisson probability distribution as described in the book. A sample file of STR results is included that you can use as a model to input into the cladogram-generating freeware found on the Fluxus Engineering web site at http://www.fluxus-engineering.com/sharenet.htm. By replacing the sample data with your own STR marker names, participant IDs, and marker values, you can create your own dataset with a minimum of effort.

The references provided at the end of each chapter are given on this CD, and include hotlinks to a wide range of topics, such as the history of the Canadian Pacific Railroad in Canada, the reconstruction of 1000-yr-old weather records, and a description of the effects that ergotism has had on western civilization.”

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Digital Detective

  • Introduction
  • Getting Started
  • Location, Location, Location
  • When?
  • Stumpers

A Case Study in Digital Detective Work — Where, Who, When, and Why

The Database Detective

  • Introduction
  • Getting Started
  • Periodical Databases–Using City Directories
  • Event Databases
  • Unusual Reference Materials
  • Using Multiple Sources to Construct a Family Story
  • Cultural Profiling

Case Study in Database Detective Work — The History of the Ulmer Family

The DNA Detective

  • Introduction
  • About DNA
  • Mutations
    • Single Nucleotide Polymophisms (SNPs)
      • Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Clades
      • Y-DNA Haplogroups
      • X-Chromosome SNPs
      • Autosomal DNA Testing
    • Y-DNA Short Tandem Repeats (STRs)
  • Single Name Studies
  • Non-Paternity Events
  • Genetic Genealogy Testing Companies and Testing Options
  • Online Databases
  • The Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA)
  • Cladograms
  • There Will Always Be Mysteries Left

Appendix A – A Short Discussion of the Mathematical Models Used for MRCA Calculations

Appendix B – How to Construct a Spreadsheet for MRCA Analysis

Appendix C – Creating a Cladogram

Appendix D – Pairwise Mismatches

 

Order a copy of Forensic Genealogy – Revised from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $25.97.