Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

“From trade directories, petty sessions, and DNA to Currency, Ships and even Irish-American Soldiers in the US Civil War, we’ll show you the resources you need to find your Irish ancestors!”

That is the splash on the front cover of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. Moorshead Magazines is the publisher of Your Genealogy Today, Internet Genealogy, and History Magazine. Every so often the company collects the best articles on a particular subject from each of the three magazines and combines them into a special edition. Like the recently reviewed Tracing You English & Scottish Ancestors, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors is one Moorshead’s special genealogical releases.

Produced in 2012, this 66-page special edition features 12 articles relevant to Irish research (a complete article list is provided below). As the cover text states, articles cover a wide variety of topics. Many article are printed with images and sample to get a better feel for the topic. Alan Stewart’s article on Internet-based Irish research covers over 50 websites, with full URLs and a brief summary of each. Page by page, the reader is taken through the various topics covered by each author’s area of expertise.

Family Roots Publishing is offering this publication at 10% off through March 21, 2017.

Even though each article appeared previously in one of Moorshead’s three magazines, before publication articles were updated to ensure source materials and online references were up to date. While some references may change with time, having the source names can help researches find any altered sites usually with some ease.

Whether the research lives in Ireland or is the descendant of an Irish immigrant, the information from these articles is highly relevant. With modern communications, the world seems to shrink more each year. The cost of communicating and accessing documents and records located around the world is faster and cheaper than ever before.

 

Contents

Can You Get a Certificate of Irish Heritage

Hilda McGauley looks at a fun, and informative, way to recognize your Irish heritage

Your Irish Ancestry Online: A Definitive Guide

Alan Stewart goes online in search of the top Internet-based Irish research resources

Online Irish Family History Resources

From Ireland’s local governments and libraries, David A. Norris looks at what is on the ‘Net

The Court of Petty Sessions

David A. Norris looks at Irish court records that might contain many ancestors names

City and Trade Directories

David A. Norris looks at an important resource for researching your Irish roots

Locating the Exact Origin of Your Irish Ancestor

Marie Daly looks at some important resources for researching your Irish ancestor

Six Steps to Research Success: Irish Style!

Brian Michell documents the six crucial steps necessary to reach your online research goal

Ancestors, Ships and the Sea

David A. Norris looks at the online resources available if your Irish ancestor was a sea rover

Ireland’s Money and Your Genealogy

David A. Norris looks at the local currency your Irish ancestor would’ve used

Finding Help With Your Scots-Irish Line

Cindy Thomas looks at the resources available to assist you with your Scots-Irish research

Surnames and Genetics in Ireland

Anthony Adolph explains how ancient surnames and modern genetics make perfect partners

Civil War Soldiers

David A. Norris looks at the resources available if your Irish ancestor fought in the Civil War

 

Order copies of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing.

Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 – On Sale for 25% Off Thru December 17

Since the Civil War Era volume is selling so well this season, we’ve decided to run Dollarhide’s Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790-1920 on sale for 25% off thru December 17. That’s the best price FRPC has ever offered on the volume I believe.

Click here to order the Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790-1920 – at 25% off – just $44.96 (Reg. $59.95).

Following is a review of the volume.

The county has always been used as the basic Federal census unit. Genealogical research in the census, therefore, begins with identifying the correct county jurisdictions. Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 shows county outline maps across the United States at ten-year intervals. Effectively, a map of each state’s county lines at the time of each Federal census through 1920.

This work (one of the top-five best selling genealogy books) shows all U.S. county boundaries from 1790 to 1920. The books starts with an introduction to the Federal censuses, the records, and basic facts for each enumeration. Page xxvi provides a sample map, explanation, and legend as used on the nearly 400 maps in the book. Key elements include the following:

  • Each map shows modern counties and states with a white outline
  • Black outlines show the counties as they existed at the time of the relevant census
  • modern lines which match the old boundaries also appear in black (the black overlaying the while)
  • Defunct counties appear in the index in italics
  • Dashed lines indicate boundaries through water, uncertain boundaries, etc. (sometimes noted in the “notes” section on the page)

With each map there is data on boundary changes, notes about the census, and locality finding keys. There also are inset maps that clarify territorial lines, a state-by-state bibliography of sources, and an appendix outlining pitfalls in mapping county boundaries. Other details such as major Indian treaty lines are also covered.

The volume includes an index listing all present-day counties, plus nearly all defunct counties or counties later re-named. Maps in the book are shown in chronological order, alphabetically by state.

 

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction • Federal Censuses

  • History
  • Records
  • Completeness

Sample Map

U.S. Maps, 1790–1920

State Maps

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Loisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Appendix

  • Pitfalls in Mapping Boundaries

Bibliography

  • National Projects
  • General Sources
  • State Sources

County Index, by State

 

Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC5786.

Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era — by Bill Dollarhide; 35% Off Thru December 17

For Day 8 of the 2016 FRPC 12 Days of Christmas sale, FRPC is offering Bill Dollarhide’s Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era at 35% off, making it just $21.42. Click on this link to order.

civil-war-era-350pw-75resMost genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era, by William Dollarhide, identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories, as well as others, are identified within this book:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories

The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

    • Online Resources
    • Libraries & Archives

Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists; by William Dollarhide; 2009; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp., Reg. $32.95 – 35% Off Through December 17, 2016 – just $21.42 (plus $5.50 p&h).

Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans – only 1 Penny – Just pay $8 P&H – USA Sales – Nov 22 & 23, 2016 Only

Family Roots Publishing has found that we have several cases of these books in stock, and want to blow them out. We’re making them just 1 cent Tuesday and Wednesday, November 29 and 30, 2016. Buyers need just pay the $8 p&h.

Following is a review:

In his History of New Hampshire, historian Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole attempts to answer the question, “What makes a man prominent?” In his words:

“Whoever has helped notably in the great march of human progress deserves credit therefor in the popular estimation. Abilities, character and achievement make men prominent. Learning and money may be helpful, but they are not enough; without character they may the sooner sink one into oblivion.”

This seems to me as good as any definition. By whatever scale of prominence men have chosen to use, historians has provided us with tales, biographies, and accounts of men deemed important in their own right. Histories are written of events from those that changed the world to the deeds of men known only in their own communities. Either way, research can help uncover these men and their deeds. Family historians should take note that many of these histories contain vital genealogical data about not only individuals of prominence, but also their families, their acquaintances, and those with whom they interact, fixing these individual in time and place.

Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans, by William S. Speer, is a prime example of a selective history of men in Tennessee. By whatever right the Honorable William Speer though these men important, he has immortalized their names through the written word. First published in 1888, Speer selected 259 men from 19th century Tennessee for his historical record. “It is this kind of unique first-hand biographical information that makes Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans unequaled in the canon of Tennessee genealogical literature. Not only did compiler William S. Speer have the unparalleled opportunity to interview a number of the featured Tennesseans himself, he also was able to garner–and include in this book–thousands and thousands of names of their family members, friends, and colleagues.” Republished in 2008, this type of book is a treasure to both those interested in Tennessean history as well as to genealogists.

As would be hoped, these sketches include many details about the lives of these men and their families. Speer offers, often extraordinary, insight into the personal, professional, and sometimes even physical characteristics that made each of these men a success. A complete list of names, or even surnames, would be too lengthy to list here. However, below is a list of surnames of those men highlighted in this book.

 

Pick up a copy of Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans from Family Roots Publishing; Regular Price: $45. Just 1 penny November 22 and 23 – Just pay the $8 P&H.

 

Surnames featured in the book:

  • Anderson
  • Arrington
  • Atkins
  • Atlee
  • Baptist
  • Barrett
  • Bartlett
  • Bate
  • Baxter
  • Bearden
  • Bibb
  • Black
  • Blankenship
  • Boynton
  • Bradford
  • Briggs
  • Brockway
  • Brown
  • Buchanan
  • Buist
  • Burney
  • Burns
  • Burrus
  • Butler
  • Callender
  • Campbell
  • Chester
  • Childress
  • Clapp
  • Clift
  • Coldwell
  • Cole
  • Conner
  • Cooper
  • Cowan
  • Craft
  • Cullom
  • Dake
  • Dashiell
  • Deaderick
  • DeWitt
  • Dibrell
  • Dickens
  • Dodd
  • East
  • Elder
  • Elliott
  • Erskine
  • Estes
  • Evans
  • Eve
  • Ewing
  • Fain
  • Fentress
  • Ferriss
  • Fleming
  • Folsom
  • Foote
  • Foster
  • Frayser
  • Freeman
  • Frierson
  • Frizzell
  • Fulkerson
  • Gantt
  • Gaines
  • Gallaway
  • Gardenhire
  • Gaut
  • Gibson
  • Glass
  • Godwin
  • Golliday
  • Goodbar
  • Grant
  • Graves
  • Green
  • Greer
  • Hadden
  • Hall
  • Haller
  • Harding
  • Hardwick
  • Harrell
  • Harris
  • Harrison
  • Haynes
  • Heiskell
  • Henderson
  • Henning
  • Hill
  • Holman
  • Holmes
  • Houk
  • House
  • Howell
  • Hughes
  • Humes
  • Ingersoll
  • Jackson
  • Jones
  • Jordan
  • Keating
  • Kennedy
  • Key
  • Killebrew
  • King
  • Kyle
  • Larkin
  • Latta
  • Lea
  • Ledgerwood
  • Lidsley
  • Lipscomb
  • Livingston
  • Looney
  • Long
  • McAdoo
  • McBride
  • McConnell
  • McDowell
  • McFarland
  • McFerrin
  • McGuire
  • McMurray
  • McNeal
  • McTyeire
  • McWhirter
  • Maddin
  • Marchbanks
  • Marks
  • Martin
  • Mathes
  • Maruy
  • Meek
  • Menees
  • Mitchell
  • Morgan
  • Moore
  • Mumford
  • Muse
  • Neal
  • Neely
  • Neilson
  • Nelson
  • Netherland
  • Nichol
  • Nichols
  • Nicholson
  • Overton
  • Paine
  • Palmer
  • Patterson
  • Pettibone
  • Phillips
  • Pitman
  • Plunket
  • Porter
  • Quarles
  • Rambaut
  • Randolph
  • Reid
  • Richardson
  • Roberts
  • Robison
  • Rodgers
  • Rose
  • Safford
  • Sanford
  • Saunders
  • Scobey
  • Sears
  • Senter
  • Shearer
  • Sheppard
  • Shields
  • Simonton
  • Smith
  • Smitheal
  • Smithson
  • Staley
  • Stark
  • Stephens
  • Stewart
  • Stockell
  • Stokes
  • Tarver
  • Taylor
  • Temple
  • Thompson
  • Thomas
  • Thornburgh
  • Thornton
  • Thurman
  • Tinnon
  • Trewhitt
  • Trousdale
  • Turley
  • Turney
  • Ussery
  • Vance
  • Van Deman
  • Van Dyke
  • Vertrees
  • Wade
  • Ward
  • Warder
  • Watson
  • White
  • Whitthorne
  • Wilder
  • Williamson
  • Wilson
  • Wood
  • Woods
  • Wright
  • Young

Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History – 40% Off Tuesday & Wed.

Family Roots Publishing is offering Jeff Bockman’s Give a Gift That Money Can’t Buy for 40% off (Just $5.37) Tuesday & Wednesday only, November 22 & 23, 2016.

Gift of GenealogyAfter more than five years, Jeffrey A. Bockman, has published a major update to his popular book, Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History. Now in its fifth edition, this fantastic primer covers all the basics needed for the novice to get started with family history research. Sometimes genealogists forget an important part of family history research, leaving their own story behind. Bockman created this book to guide and inspire anyone with an inkling of interest into their own past, to help search it out and leave both it and their own stories behind for future genealogists.

In this book Bockman covers all the basics, for example:

  • Forms to record the basic facts
  • Saving  documents future researchers will need
  • Identifying people in photographs
  • Preservation
  • Finding and telling family stories
  • Conducting your own research

This fifth edition is a major revision, adding over five additional years of experience and new resources. New for the fifth edition:

  • More family stories and photographs
  • Newer sources
  • More online resources
  • A new section on searching techniques
  • Comments about genealogy travel with examples
  • Mini case study (to give hope to those who have a relative that disappeared)

The book is organized for easy reading with plenty of examples to help the beginner get started. If you know someone looking to get started with family history or  hoping to help someone develop and interest in their families stories, then this book would help them in the process.

Not only is this book one of the best primers available, it is priced affordably. Family Roots Publishing has Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, for only $5.37.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

  • About the author
  • Introduction

Family Facts

  • Identify family members and key events
  • Recording information on standardized forms
    • Family Group Sheet
    • Ancestor Chart

Home Sources

  • Supporting documents that help to provide the necessary proof
  • List of what to use, keep, and preserve
  • Important home sources
  • Bockman family home sources

Photographs

  • Help turn names and dates into real people
  • Identify the people, the time, and the place

Preservation

  • Saving items for future generations
  • Paper & document preservation
  • Photo preservation

Family Stories

  • Can only be told by someone who was a part of it
  • Timeline of events
  • Bockman family history

Organizing It All

  • Assembling all of the information

Family History Research

  • How to start researching your family
    • Vital records
    • Wills & probate records
    • Cemetery records
    • Newspapers/obituaries
    • Census records
    • Other records
    • Immigrants
    • Didn’t find it in the index
    • Genealogy travel
    • Case Study: Finding Alvar a not so great dane

Our Family

  • Title page
  • Guidelines for filling in your forms
    • Three family group sheets
    • One ancestor charts
    • Two timeline pages
    • Notes page

The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How To Trace Your Germanic Ancestry In Europe – 30% Off Thru Nov 10, 2016

Family Roots Publishing recently purchase a good stock of Jim Beidler’s The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide. We’re discounting it 30%, making it just $17.49 – through November 10, or while supplies last – whichever comes first. Following is a review of the book:

fnw11As a publisher, I really appreciate reviewing books first capture my eye with clean and clear page design (typesetting). When simple clean fonts are chosen with structured and organized page elements meeting basic design guidelines. When photos, charts, samples, and images stand out on a page as independent elements, but don’t overwhelm the page making it difficult to continue reading, this marks a respect for the reader, making the learning process easier. This clear type of design seems to be a standard at Family Tree Books. Their titles The Family Tree Guidebook To Europe: Your Essential Guide To Trace Your Genealogy In Europe, 2nd Ed. and The Family Tree Problem Solver : Tried And True Tactics For Tracing Elusive Ancestors are great examples. There is a third book published by this group, which we have not previously reviewed but is worth a look, that continues this simple but elegant design model, The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How To Trace Your Germanic Ancestry In Europe. Of course, its not all just about the layout. The content matters, and to that we give credit on this new German book to its author, James M. Beidler.

The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How To Trace Your Germanic Ancestry In Europeis your standard guide to research German ancestry. According to the cover, this book teaches you how to:

  • “Retrace you German immigrant ancestors’ voyage from Europe to America
  • Pinpoint the precise place in Europe your ancestors came from
  • Uncover birth, marriage, death, church, census, court, military,and other records documenting your ancestors’ lives
  • Access German records of your family from your own hometown
  • Decipher German-language records, including unfamiliar German script
  • Understand German names and naming patterns that offer research clues”

The concepts taught and examples given in this book aren’t necessarily new. However, these ideas, lessons, and tips are relatively thorough and well thought out. Putting this guide into practice in your own Germanic research would be easy, and you are very likely going to find some ideas as new to you. Plus, as a new book, all the resource lists will be fresh and up to date, including any websites.

German research has many unique challenges, which you probably already know. Taking advice from experienced researchers, such as author James M. Beidler, can only help your progress. So, whether you are new to German research, or seasoned in your own right, you may just find something new and useful in The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How To Trace Your Germanic Ancestry In Europe.

 

Contents

Introduction

Part I Linking Your Family Tree to German-Speaking Nations

Chapter 1 Your German-Speaking Heritage

Chapter 2 Identifying the German-Speaking Immigrant

Chapter 3 Pinpointing the Place of Origin

Chapter 4 The history of Germanic Lands

Part 2 Getting to Know the Old Country

Chapter 5 Understanding Germany’s Geography

Chapter 6 Language, Surnames, Given Names

Part 3 Tracing Your Family in German-Speaking Nations

Chapter 7 Civil Registration in Germany

Chapter 8 German Church Records

Chapter 9 German Census and Court Records

Chapter 10 German Military Records

Chapter 11 Printed Records

Chapter 12 German-Speaking Peoples Outside of Germany

Part 4 Advanced Sources and Strategies

Chapter 13 Putting it all Together

Chapter 14 What to Do When You Get Stuck

Appendices

Understanding German Script

Sample Letters to Request Records

Civil Record Archives in Europe

Church Archives in Germany

U.S. Genealogy Archives and Libraries

Societies: German, Genealogical, & Historical

Publications and Websites

Index

 

Your own copy of The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How To Trace Your Germanic Ancestry In Europe awaits from Family Roots Publishing.

Genealogical Resources in English Repositories – 648 page hardback for 1 Cent – Just pay $8 p&h

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It’s now near the end of October, and FRPC must take inventory on December 26. We’ve still got several large cases of Moulton’s Genealogical Resources in English Repositories on hand. We need to unload them and make warehouse space for new titles. For this reason, we’ve decided to sell them for just 1 Cent. Just pick up the p&h of $8.00. So – for $8.01 you can have what is most likely the best overall list of British resources in print. The book initially sold for $45. If printed today, it would more than likely be $75 or more. The book is now over 20 years old, and the PRO in England has had many changes in where you’ll find their resources. So you might have to use Google to search for the exact location of any particular PRO resource (A tiny minority of overall resources). The book will tells what resources are available – and it’s worth a lot more than the p&h cost…

CLICK HERE, ON THE ILLUSTRATION, OR ANY OF THE LINKS TO ORDER.

Following is a review written several years ago:
While the information so nicely gathered into this single book, Genealogical Resources in English Repositories, can be found in many other locations; sometimes, it is nice to have this type of information in one place, as a quick and easy reference. This book represents an exhaustive listing of available genealogical resources available in Britain. Listed in these pages are major national archives and libraries, repositories in the greater London area, and county by county listings. This book is also the winner of the National Genealogical Society’s 1993 Book Award for Excellence in Genealogical Methods and Sources.

Genealogical Resources was designed to provide “genealogists and historians with…information on resources in the key repositories in England. It categorizes manuscript records, as well as printed, transcribed and microfilm materials, with respect to their contents, and in most instances, lists covering dates.” Originally intended to help Americans find ancestral information.

County listings represent the bulk of the information. Each county opens with a short review of local geographical and political/administrative boundary changes made over the years. The listing of each library, archive, records office, or other repository is complete with address (mostly likely not changed over the years), phone number (possibly changed over the years), and holdings of genealogical value (which most likely have only expanded over the years). Publications of possible interest are also listed.

Please note that there have been significant changes in the PRO over the years, and it might be necessary to use Google to locate the exact location of some records listed within this volume.

While this book predates web usage as we know it today (including Google), is still serves as a great one-stop listing for finding genealogically important holding in England. Think of running a search at Google for English repositories, then reducing the results to an accurate, non-repeating listing of resources and then printing those results with a listing of holdings at each repository. That pretty well describes Genealogical Resources in English Repositories.

Each book comes with a 1992 and 1996 update supplement. Just having the names of the various repositories gives the reader the name to search for when using the Internet.
 
Get a copy of Genealogical Resources in English Repositories for yourself or your favorite society’s library.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
List of Abbreviations
List of Symbols

Part I: Greater London Repositories

Baptist Church House
British Library, Department of Manuscripts
British Library, India Office Library and Records
British Library Newspaper Library
College of Arms
Corporation of London Record Office
Guildhall Library
House of Lords Record Office
Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland
Lambeth Palace Library
LDS Hyde Park Family History Centre
National Army Museum
National Maritime Museum
Principal Registry of the Family Division, Somerset House
Public Record Office, Chancery Lane
Public Record Office, Kew
Public Record Office, Portugal Street
Religious Society of Friends
Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts
Society of Genealogists
Unitarian Historical Society
Untied Reformed Church History Society
United Synagogue, Archives of
Wesley Historical Society Library
Westminster, Diocesan Archives
Dr. Williams’ Library

Part II: County Repositories (summarized)

 

Each county listing includes:

  • Record Office(s)
  • Other Repositories
  • Genealogical and Family History Societies

A few counties and metropolitan areas include sections for:

  • Metropolitan District Archives and Local History Libraries, OR
  • District Archives and Libraries

Counties are listed alphabetically as follows:

  • Avon
  • Befordshire
  • Berkshire
  • Buckinghamshire
  • Cambridgeshire
  • Cheshire
  • Cleveland
  • Cornwall
  • Cumberland
  • Cumbria
  • Derbyshire
  • Devon(shire)
  • Dorset
  • Durham
  • Essex
  • Gloucestershire
  • Hampshire
  • Hereford and Worcester
  • Hereforshire
  • Hertfordshire
  • Humberside
  • Huntingdonshiore
  • Kent
  • Lancashire
  • Leicstershire
  • Lincolnshire
  • London, County of Manchester, Greater
  • Meseyside
  • Middlesex
  • Midlands, West
  • Norfolk
  • Northamptonshire
  • Northumberland
  • Nottinghamshire
  • Oxfordshire
  • Rutland
  • Shropshire
  • Somerset
  • Staffordshire
  • Suffolk
  • Suffolk, East
  • Suffolk, West
  • Surrey
  • Sussex
  • Sussex, East
  • Sussex, West
  • Tyne and Wear
  • Warwickshire
  • Westmorland
  • Wight, Isle of
  • Wiltshire
  • Worcestershire
  • Yorkshire, East Riding
  • Yorkshire, North Riding
  • Yorkshire, West Riding
  • Yorkshire, North
  • Yorkshire, South
  • Yorkshire, West

Part III: London Borough Repositories

Greater London

Barking and Dagenham

  • Valence Reference Library
  • Barking Central Library

Barnet

  • Local History Library
  • Chipping Barnet Library
  • Church End (Finchley) Library

Bexley

  • Bexley Libraries and Museum Department

Brent

  • Grange Museum of Local History

Bromley

  • Bromley Central Library

Camden

  • Swiss Cottage Library
  • Holborn Library

Croydon

  • Croydon Public Libraries

Ealing

  • Local History Library

Enfield

  • Local History Unit

Greenwich

  • Greenwich Local History and Archives Centre

Hackney

  • Hackney Archives and Local History Department

Hammersmith and Fulham

  • Hammersmith and Fulham Archives

Haringey

  • Haringey Libraries

Harrow

  • Harrow Civic Centre Library

Havering

  • Havering Central Library

Hillingdon

  • Hillingdon Local History Collection

Hounslow

  • Chiswick Public Library
  • Brentford Public Library
  • Hounslow Public Library
  • Feltham Public Library

Islington

  • Islington Central Library
  • Finsbury Library

Kensington and Chelsea, Royal Borough of

  • Kensington Central Library
  • Chelsea Library

Kingston upon Thames, Royal Borough of

  • Kingston upon Thames Heritage Service

Lambeth

  • Lambeth Archives Department

Lewisham

  • Lewisham Library Service

Merton

  • Mitcham Library
  • Morden Library
  • Wembledon Reference Library

Newham

  • Local Studies Library

Redbridge

  • Redbridge Central Library

Richmond upon Thames

  • Richmond upon Thames Central Reference Library
  • Twickenham Reference Library

Southwark

  • Southwark Local Studies Library

Sutton

  • Sutton Central Library

Tower Hamlets

  • Tower Hamlets Central Library

Waltham Forest

  • Vestry House Museum

Wandsworth

  • Battersea District Library

City of Westminster

  • Westminster City Archives Department
  • Marylebone Library Archives Department

Other Repositories

  • LDS Family History Centre (Staines)

Genealogical and Family History Societies

  • Central Middlesex Family History Society
  • North Middlesex Family History Society
  • West Middlesex Family History Society
  • Waltham Forest Family History Society
  • Woolwich and District Family History Society

 

Appendix: Useful Addresses

Index

Maps (enlarged)

  • Pre-1974 Counties of England
  • Post-1974 Counties of England
  • Post-1965 London Boroughs

Supplements

  • Supplement to Genealogical Resources in English Repositories (1992)
  • 1996 Supplement Update: Genealogical Resources in English Repositories

The United States Genealogical County Map

Large maps are fun and useful, if just for the details they can show. The Genealogical County Map is a large format, 27″ by 39″, map of the United States. This map shows rivers, lakes, state capitals and every county by name. Maybe its the genealogical geek in me, but an over-sized map of state counties is just cool.

The Genealogical County Map is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: EV0014, Price: $17.95. FRPC has a limited number of the maps on hand, and is currently running a sale on them at 28% off, making them just $12.92.

Genealogy At A Glance: War of 1812 Research

“Over 250,000 men served in the War of 1812, some for as little as a month. Their service records are found mostly in the National Archives but also in various other archives and repositories, and therefore in order to use the War of 1812 records effectively the researcher needs a guide to the location of the records and a description of their contents, which is precisely what this At a Glance guide is designed to do.

The vast majority of War of 1812 records consist of (1) pension records, (2) compiled military service records, and (3) bounty land warrant application files. There are other records, of course, but these are the three main entry points in genealogical research. The purpose of this guide is to show you where these records are located, what they contain, and whether they are indexed, microfilmed, digitized, or found online.

These records have great genealogical value and generally the researcher can expect to find some or all of the following information:

  • Soldier’s name, rank, unit, and period of service
  • Amount of pension or rejection of pension application
  • Name of widow and marriage date and place
  • Birth year and place
  • Places of residence
  • Description of disability
  • Signatures
  • Names of relatives, friends, and neighbors”

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color laminated brochure, meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research.

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Finding a War of 1812 Soldier

Preserving the Pensions

What is a Pension?

Genealogical Value of Military Pensions

The War of 1812 Preserve the Pension Project

Original NARA Record Sources Not Online

Compiled Military Service Records

Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files

Regular Army Records

Navy Records

Prisoner of War Records

Other Records Sources

Lineage Societies

State Records

National Parks and Battlegrounds

The More You Know

Online Resources

Research Checklist for Militiamen

 

Genealogy at a Glance: The War of 1812 Research is available from Family Roots Publishing.

From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes – Now on Sale for 55% Off thru Feb. 9, 2016

Food makes up, and takes up, a considerable portion of our human existence. A large portion of our time goes to earning an income, from which a significant portion goes to food. Hours can be spent each day preparing the daily meals. Major significance is given to the customs, habits, and manners surrounding food. Food can tell us about who we are, where we live, and in what time period we exist. The same is true for those who have gone on before us.  Food, often overlooked, should be a significant part of ones genealogical research. Learning about our food heritage and even those secret family recipes is made easier using From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes, by Gena Philibert-Ortega.

The book looks like a blast-from-the-past, hardbound, family recipe book. However, inside this creative little book one can find historical recipes, food traditions and clues to one’s family food past. Here are just a few things covered in this book:

  • “Methods for gathering family recipes
  • Interview questions to help loved ones record their food memories
  • Places to search for historical recipes
  • An explanation of how immigrants influenced the American diet
  • A look at how technology changed the way people eat
  • A glossary of historical cooking terms
  • Actual recipes from late nineteenth–and early twentieth-century cookbooks”

The author suggests you are now thinking,”What does food have to do with genealogy?” Her response, “For me, the real question is why doesn’t everyone include food traditions in their family history? I grew up in Southern California. Mexican dishes from tamales to burritos and tacos to quesadillas have always been a common factor in my life. But, I remember when finding a taco stand in other states was nearly impossible. I remember hearing of family friends who moved back east and could only find tortillas in a can. Now, it seems Mexican dishes are nearly a mainstay of the average American home. This book walks the reader through understanding and preserving one’s own food heritage as well as researching and evaluating one’s ancestral dietary connections.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

PART A: DISCOVER YOUR FAMILY’S FOOD HERITAGE

Chapter 1 Food Heritage

Genealogy is more than names and dates. Studying social history will help you better understand how your ancestors lived.

Chapter 2 They Brought Their Food With Them

Immigrants brought recipes, raw ingredients, and even seeds from their homelands. How did these food traditions meld into our ancestors’ diet?

Chapter 3 Oysters, Peacocks, and Green Jell-O

Food traditions vary by region, state, county, city, and even neighborhood. This chapter explores the impact of climate, ethnic and religious groups, and industry on our food.

Chapter 4 Food Throughout Time

The foods your ancestors ate were often influenced or dictated by technology, location, and social and political events such as economic depression and war.

Chapter 5 Cookbooks and Menus

This chapter explores the evolution of cookbooks since the eighteenth century and explores menus from nineteenth-century restaurants.

Chapter 6 How to Find your  Ancestor’s Recipes

The best place to find family recipes is in your own home. You can also interview relatives and research local cookbooks to learn more about your ancestors’ diets.

PART 2: A LOOK BACK AT HISTORICAL RECIPES

Chapter 7 Decipher Old Cooking Terms

Having trouble understanding an old recipe? This chapter includes a vintage glossary of cooking terms, measuring charts, and cooking times.

Chapter 8 The Arts of Dining and Cleaning

Cookbooks are more than just recipes. Read vintage advice on menu planning, table setting and decorating, and proper cleaning techniques.

Chapter 9 Historical Recipes

This chapter contains recipes from both community cookbooks and cooking school cookbooks and from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

PART 3: RECIPE JOURNAL

Record you own family recipes in this journal section

Bibliography and Resources

Index

 

Delve into your own culinary heritage in From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes, available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPO01, NOW ON SALE FOR 55% OFF! Just $12.60; Reg. Price: $27.99.

NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland

“and then on the 3 of March came into Chesapeake bay, at the mouth of the Patomecke, this baye is the most delightfull water I ever saw, between two seet lande, with a channel, 4:5:6:7: and 8 fathoms deepe, some 10 leagues broad, at time of yeare full of fish, yet it doth yeild to Patomecke, which we have made St. Gregories; this is teh sweetest and greatest river have seene, so that the Thames is but a little finder to it, there are noe marshes or swampes about it, but solid firme ground.” — Father Andrew White, S.J.

ngs04This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland; written by Patricia O’Brien Shawker.

“The Chesapeake Bay described by Father White dominates Maryland… At the time of Maryland’s founding, it was increadibly rich in fish and shellfish, a magnet attracting the Europeans…

“Knowledge of the history of Maryland and the nature of the record keeping is essential when conducting genealogical research. As one of the original thirteen colonies, Maryland had 140 years of colonial history and has one of the most complete collections of colonial records.”

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Women of Maryland, you will find the following:

“The Maryland State Archives has three online research aids for women. One is the Women Legislators of Maryland, another is the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame, and the third is Maryland Women Citizen; Women’s History at the Maryland State Archives. All three of these have biographical and genealogical information about women in Maryland. There are more than one hundred items useful for researching women in the Archives’ special collections including the records of women’s clubs in Maryland (minutes and reports) and the records of the Young Women’s Christian Association (directories, minutes, and reports). Other useful records are city directories (which usually list them as a widow), wills, marriage, divorce, church, land, and military pension records. The Maryland Room at the Hornbake Library of the University of Maryland has a resource guide for women, which includes the Female Writer’s of Maryland, Biographies of Women from Maryland, and Maryland Women’s History.”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Authors

Patricia O’Brien Shawker is a professional genealogist and lecturer. She served as the Director of the National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) and has served as the treasurer for the National Genealogical Society.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Enoch Pratt Free Library
  • Maryland Genealogical Society
  • Maryland Historical Society
  • Maryland State Archives
  • Maryland State Law Library
  • National Archives — College Park
  • Other Facilities
  • Other Libraries and Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Archives of Maryland
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Directories
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Census
    • Federal Census
  • City and County Directories
  • County Records
  • Court Records
    • Colonial
    • Post-Colonial
    • After 1851
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Germans American
    • Irish American
    • Jewish American
    • Native American
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Land Grants
    • State Land Grants
    • Subsequent Land Records Transactions – County and Baltimore City Land Records
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Colonial Wars
    • American Revolution
    • War of 1812
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Spanish American War
    • World War I
    • World War II
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
    • Colonial Tax Records
    • Later Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Maryland
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland, are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

NGS Research in the States Series: Colorado

ngs02

“’Gold! Gold!! Gold!!! Gold!!!! Hard to Get and Heavy to Hold. Come to Kansas!’ read the headlines in 1858 when gold was discovered at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in the region later to be named Colorado. Thousands of adventurous souls reacted to such headlines by crossing the plains in wagons inscribed ‘Pikes Peak or Bust!’”

This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Colorado; written by Kathleen W. Hinckley.

“Men and women of commerce, gamblers, outlaws, runaway slaves, fancy ladies, and speculators followed closely behind the argonauts—the gold seekers. They organized settlements that included assayer offices, legal services, general stores, stables, saloons, and inns. These fledgling communities vied for the argonauts’ business and attracted morticians, journalists, doctors, and ministers—as well as government clerks who began the record and sources cherished by genealogists.” These are your Colorado ancestors

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Ethnic Records, you will find the following:

“Germans were the largest group of early immigrants to Colorado, followed by Irish, English, Scandinavians (Swedish, Danes, and Norwegians), Scots, and Italians. Numerous printed sources offer histories of particular ethnic groups represented among the settlers of Colorado. The Colorado Magazine, for example, has published articles on African Americans, Chinese, Hispanics, Indians, German-Russians, Irish, Italians, Poles, and Swedes. The Helen Karrer Guide to the Colorado Magazine directs researchers to the appropriate articles.

“A unique way to get a glimpse of ethnic groups in Colorado in the early twentieth century is to study the index of…”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Authors

“Kathleen W. Hinckley, Certified Genealogist, is past president and honorary life member of the Colorado Genealogical Society.”  Currently, she is the executive director of the Association of Professional Genealogists and business manager of the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. She has served in several key roles in many major societies and organizations, and has written at least two additional guides/books on genealogical research topics.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

Early History and Settlements

  • Early History
  • Settlement
  • Migration

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Black American West Museum
  • Boulder Genealogical Society
  • Carnegie Branch, Boulder Public Library
  • Colorado Genealogical Society
  • Colorado Society of Hispanic Genealogy
  • Colorado Sate Archives
  • Denver Public Library Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library
  • Denver Public Library Western History & Genealogy Department
  • Lloyd Files Research Library–Museum of Western Colorado
  • Norlin Library–University of Colorado
  • National Archives–Rocky Mountain Region
  • Olibama Lopez-Tushar Hispanic Legacy Research Center
  • Penrose Library, Pikes Peak Library District
  • Robert Hoag Rawlings Public Library, Pueblo  City-County Library District
  • Rocky Mountain Jewish Historical Society
  • Stephen H. Hart Library, Colorado Historical Society

Major Resources

  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • 1860 Territorial Censuses
    • 1861 Territorial Election Records
    • 1866 Territorial Enumeration
    • 1870 and 1880 Federal Censuses–Auxiliary or Non-Population Schedules
  • City and County Directories
  • Court Records
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Chinese from California
    • Germans from Russia
    • Hispanic
    • Japanese
    • Jewish
    • Native American
  • Land Records
    • Spanish and Mexican Land Grants
    • Mexican Land Records
    • Federal Land Records
    • County-Level Land Records
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Federal Level Military Records
    • State Level Military Records
    • Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Records
    • Colorado Veterans’ Grave Registration, 1862-1949
    • 10th Mountain Division Collection (WWII)
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
    • Colorado Obituary Project
    • Denver (Denver County)
    • Colorado Springs (El Paso County)
    • Longmont (Boulder County)
    • Mesa County
    • Pueblo (Pueblo County)
    • Weld County
  • Probate Records
    • Denver City and County
    • El Paso County
    • Pueblo County
  • Railroad Employee Records
  • Religious Records
    • Catholic (Roman)
    • Episcopalian
    • Methodist
  • Tax Records
  • Territorial Records
  • Vital Records
    • Birth and Death Certificates
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Women of Colorado
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Colorado, are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

NGS Research in the States Series: Georgia

ngs15

“Georgia, the thirteenth colony, was established in 1733. The state had frontier land until almost the beginning of the Civil War and extinguished the last Indian title within its boundaries in 1835. This continual push to open new land characterizes the first on hundred years of state history and is crucial to understanding the movements of people across the state. The records they created document the lives and relationships sought by their descendants today. To help researchers better document Georgia families, this guide outlines the types of records available, identifies repositories where they might be found, and lists the most useful finding aids and published record indexes.”

This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Georgia; written by Linda Woodward Geiger and Paul K. Graham.

Home to several Indian tribes, including Creek, Yamassee, Apalache, and Cherokee, the lands to become Georgia was given to a company chartered to establish a colony between the Carolinas and Spanish controlled land. King George II gave authority in 1732 to 21 trustees. Along with the first English settlers, there were 42 Salzburger families and some Highland Scots, who after taking oaths as British Citizens, joined the newly started colony. As with all the colonies, from there things grew and immigrants came from many places.

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Historic Sites, a section not found in most of the guides, you will find the following:

“Although Georgia’s historic sites are not ‘libraries,’ they frequently possess materials that are of value to genealogists. Among the most useful for research are Andersonville National Historic Sites, Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park,…”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Authors

Linda Woodward Geiger is “a principal and instructor for Regional In-depth Genealogical Studies Alliance. She specializes in Georgia records, records held by the National Archives at Atlanta, and Cherokee heritage documentation. Her area of personal interest lies with records of Cherokee and Creek removal.

Paul K. Graham specializes in Southern families research. He holds a masters in Heritage Preservation from Georgia State University. He has published several books, written for the NGS Quarterly, and the Georgia Genealogical Society’s Quarterly, with Georgia and Georgia land use being key topics.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

Early History and Settlements

  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Georgia Archives
    • Collections
    • Published Guides
    • Online Finding Aids, Catalogs, and Other Sources
    • Online Searchable Databases and Documents
  • National Archives at Atlanta (Southeast Region)
  • University Libraries
  • Other Georgia Libraries
  • Historic Sites
  • Libraries outside Georgia with Major Georgia Holdings
  • State and Local Genealogical and Historical Societies
  • Local Societies Archives and Museums

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
    • Statewide Maps
    • Local Maps
    • Map Collections
    • Gazetters
  • Biographical Sources
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Federal Populations Statewide
    • State Census Records
  • City Records
  • County Research
  • Courts and Court Records
    • Colonial Court Records
    • Federal Court Records (NARA RG 21), 1685-1991
    • Records of the U.S. Court of Claims (NARA RG 123), 1835-1966
    • State Supreme Court and Court of Appeals
    • County Court Records, 1777-Present
    • State Courts
    • Superior Courts
    • Probate (Formerly Called Ordinary Courts)
    • Magistrate Courts
    • Municipal Courts
    • Criminal Records
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Europeans
    • Native American
  • Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Colonial Period
    • American Revolution (1775-1783)
    • Georgia Militia
    • War of 1812
    • Indian Wars
    • Cherokee Removal
    • Civil War (1861-1865)
    • Spanish American War and World Wars
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Periodicals
  • Probate Records
  • Reconstruction Records
    • Religious Records
    • Baptists
    • Catholic (Roman)
    • Episcopal
    • Jewish
    • Indian Missions
    • Lutheran
    • Methodist
    • Quaker (Society of Friends)
    • Presbyterian
    • State Research
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records 1919-1939; 1939 to Present
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
    • Bible Records
  • Women of Georgia
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Georgia, are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

NGS Research in the States Series: Michigan

ngs05

“Throughout Michigan’s varied and fascinating history, its people have been leaders. They have led the nation in the production of automobiles, iron and copper, lumber, and many agricultural products. Of even greater importance, Michigan citizens have been leaders in the movements for equitable working conditions, civil rights, and a clean environment. Perhaps, to paraphrase William Faulkner, Michigan will be a leader in helping humans to not merely survive, but prevail over our common problems.”

This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Michigan; written by Shirley M. DeBoer.

Michigan’s European settlers began with the French and British, with some others mixed in. “Later Italians and Scandinavians were miners and lumberjacks.” Quality farm land attracted many Dutch, Germans, and Irish. Of course, before the European settlers were the Native Americans, predominately the Chippewa (Ojibwa) and Potawatomi.

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Prison Records, a section not found in most of the guides, you will find the following:

“Michigan has three historic state prisons: Jackson (1837) and Ionia (1877) in the Lower Peninsula and Marquette (1889) in the Upper Peninsula. Information from comprehensive card indexes for individuals who served time in state facilities in available upon request at the archives. In addition to the card files, three Archival Circulars are helpful. ‘Correctional Facilities’ contains records from the three major correctional institutions; ‘Pardons, Paroles, Warrants, and Extraditions;’ and ‘Youths, Records Relating To’ is for adoptees or children who had problems adjusting to society. The latter restricted-access records are available with permission from outside the archives.

“Historically the state has had two federal prisons. …”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Author

Shirley M. De Boer is “a minister’s wife and high school teacher,” with a masters degree in teaching. She developed an early interest in genealogy, leading her to certification and becoming an instructor of genealogy. She specializes in New England migration through New York to the west. Shirley is a member of the Western Michigan Genealogical Society, where she has served in many key positions.  She was the Society’s 2004 recipient of the Ken Gackler Award “For Outstanding Contributions toward the Advancement and Promotion of Family History.”

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

  • Early History
  • Settlement
  • Migration
  • Economy

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Michigan Library and Historical Center
  • Archives of Michigan
  • Archives of Michigan Regional Depositories
  • Library of Michigan
  • Other Libraries
  • Michigan Genealogical Council
  • Michigan Historical Society
  • Local Societies and Historical Organizations
  • National Archives-Great Lakes Region

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Census Records
    • Pre-Statehood Census
    • Federal Census
    • State Census
    • Special Census
  • City and County Directories
  • City Records and Research
  • County and Township Records and Research
  • Court Records
    • Territorial Courts
    • Federal Courts
    • State Courts
    • Court Reporters
  • Ethnic Records
  • Land Records
  • Maritime Records
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Veterans Benefits and Soldiers’ Homes
  • Naturalization and Immigration
  • Newspapers
  • Prison Records
  • Religious Records
  • School Records, Youths and Orphans, Sanitoria and Infirmed
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth, Marriage, Divorce, and Death Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women of Michigan
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Michigan are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey

ngs07

“Our concern is with the beginnings of settlement within teh area that we know today as the State of New Jersey. Here, between the Hudson and the Delaware, people of many nationalities came together, at times in jarring conflict, but for the most part in peaceful harmony, to lay the foundations of a colony whose distinguishing mark was to be its heterogeneity. Unlike New England, where the Puritan townsman typified the whole population, or the South, where the tidewater English planter was equally predominant, New Jersey presented a picture of infinite variety. Its founders spoke many tongues, belonged to many religious denominations, practices their arts and crafts in many different ways. Each distinctive group had its own contributions to make, and each was to leave a lasting inheritance to future generations.”

This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey; written by Claire Keenan Agthe.

Like most states, New Jersey has its own unique diversity and history. Today, New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the U.S. and yet has a strong agricultural base, which helped it get its nickname the ‘Garden State.’ Its earliest settlers included the Dutch, Swedes, Finns, English, Scots, Scots-Irish, Germans, and French and generally welcomed people of many religions.

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Military Records and Benefits, you will find the following:

“New Jersey is fortunate in that no battles since the American Revolution have taken place on its soil, although many of its citizens have served in the armed services in both peacetime and wartime. Early military personnel records are scarce, but those that do exist can be valuable sources of information. The State Archives holds most state military records prior to World War I, while most subsequent state records are at the New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs. …”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

As an interesting side note, New Jersey has see no wartime battles since the American Revolution; yet, since “its position between British-held New York and rebel-held Philadelphia made New Jersey home to 296 engagements during the Revolutionary War.”

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Author

Claire Keenan Agthe is a professional genealogist, is president of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, and is a trustee of the Genealogical Society of New Jersey, where she lives. Claire lectures on copyright and Irish genealogy, and professionally conducts client research.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

  • Early History
  • Settlement
  • Migration
  • Economy
  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Genealogical Society of New Jersey
  • New Jersey Historical Society
  • New Jersey State Archives
  • New Jersey State Library
  • Rugers University: Alexander Library
  • Other Libraries
  • National Archives Regional Facility

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Census Records
    • Early Censuses and Substitutes
    • Federal Censuses and Substitutes
    • State Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • Federal Courts
  • Decedents’ Estates
    • Probate and Estate Records
    • Partitions and Divisions of Estates
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • German
    • Native American
    • Scots and Scots-Irish
  • Immigration
  • Land Records
    • Deeds
    • Mortgages
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Militia and National Guard
    • Colonial Wars (pre-1775)
    • American Revolution
    • Wars of 1791-1815
    • Mexican-American War (1846-1848)
    • Civil War (1861-1865)
    • Spanish-American War (1898)
    • World War I (1914-1918)
    • World War II (1941-1945)
    • Korean War (1950-1953) and Vietnam War (1959-1975)
  • Name Changes
  • Naturalization Records
    • Naturalizations in County and State Courts
    • Naturalizations in Federal Court
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
    • Catholic (Roman)
    • Jewish
    • Presbyterian
    • Protestant Episcopal
    • Reformed Church in America (Dutch Reformed)
    • Society of Friends (Quakers)
    • Unitarian Universalist Association
    • United Church of Christ (UCC)
    • United Methodist
  • School and Institutional Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Colonial and County Vital Records
    • State Vital Records
    • Inquisitions on the Dead (Coroner Reports)
    • Divorce Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women of New Jersey
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):